Highlights: December MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean
David S. Wilkes, MD

  • Implications of HR 1, Tax Cut and Jobs Act, on Graduate Student Stipends
    • Negative impact upon our students, UVA, and nation
      • College will be less affordable
      • Discourages participation in higher education
      • Discourages employer investment in employee learning
      • Decreases US competitiveness
      • Brightest minds will go outside of the US to advance
    • Elimination of Section 117(d) provisions
      • Devastating to research programs
      • No longer able to provide tax-free tuition for graduate students
        • Example: stipend of $24K and tuition waiver of $29K – student’s tax bill triples to $4,920
      • Erodes progress made in developing strong interest in STEM programs
        • Puts STEM education out of the reach of many students
      • Our legislators
      • Themes of Incoming UVA President Ryan
        • Community: opportunity to interact with and learn from a broadly diverse group of students, faculty, staff
        • Discovery: new knowledge that solves problems, leads to practical application, and brings new perspective to enduring questions
        • Service: public universities serve the public, starting with their own states
      • New Strategic Hire: Ken Walsh, PhD. Professor of CV Medicine and Director, Whitaker CV Institute, at Boston University SOM. Starts January 25, 2018. $.9M year one, $3.5M over five years.

Overview of Equal Opportunity & Civil Rights Policies and Reporting Options
Catherine Spear, AVP Equal Opportunity & Civil Rights
Emily Babb, AVP for Title IX Compliance & Title IX Coordinator

  • Presentation addressed:
    • Notice of non-discrimination and equal opportunity
    • Policy of Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (Title IX Policy)
    • Preventing and Addressing Discrimination and Harassment (PADH Policy) and Preventing and Addressing Retaliation (PAR Policy)
    • Why reporting is important
    • How to report prohibited conduct under these policies
    • How to address prohibited conduct
  • See presentation.

December Health System Board Update
A. Bobby Chhabra, MD, Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery

  • Dr. Chhabra shared highlights from the December 6, 2017, HSB meeting. The HS goals dashboard showed notable improvement in solid organ and bone marrow transplants and addition investments by Seed & Venture Funds, moving these two indicators to green. All other categories are yellow.
  • FY18 first-quarter financial results were shared.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in the BIMS Classroom.

2018 Pinn Scholars Named

2018 Pinn Scholars (l-r): Alison K. Criss, PhD; Scott K. Heysell, MD, MPH; Benjamin W. Purow, MD; and Jeffrey J. Saucerman, PhD.

The Pinn Scholars program, which started last year, is an initiative born from strategic planning to support and recognize our mid-level faculty. Pinn Scholars are selected on the basis of their scientific expertise and contributions to the School of Medicine and to the greater research community. Pinn Scholars are expected to develop a new project or direction in their research and share their results at the annual symposium.

I am excited to share with you the 2018 class of Pinn Scholars. They are:

  • Alison K. Criss, PhD
    Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
    Neutrophilic inflammation due to Neisseria gonorrhoea infection
  • Scott K. Heysell, MD, MPH
    Medicine/Infectious Diseases and International Health
    Novel, integrated approaches to improve outcomes of tuberculosis therapy
  • Benjamin W. Purow, MD
    Neurology
    A staged, multi-modality approach with focused ultrasound to maximize its immunotherapeutic potential for glioblastoma
  • Jeffrey J. Saucerman, PhD
    Biomedical Engineering
    Systems biology of cardiac regeneration

The inaugural Pinn Scholars — Drs. Isakson, Laurie, Peirce-Cottler, and Zimmer — recently presented updates from their research at the School of Medicine Symposium on Research Excellence. I look forward to next year’s symposium and in hearing about the results from the newest batch of Pinn Scholars’ work.

The Scholars program is named in honor of Dr. Vivian Pinn who was a graduate of the UVA School of Medicine Class of 1967. She is a member of the National Academies of Science, a fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past president of the National Medical Association.

Please join me in congratulating the incoming class of Pinn Scholars.

Margaret A. Shupnik, PhD
Gerald D. Aurbach Professor of Endocrinology
Professor of Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Research

2017 Pinn Scholars with the scholarship’s namesake, Dr. Vivian Pinn (left) at the School of Medicine’s Symposium on Research Excellence: (l-r) Brant Isakson, PhD; Gordon W. Laurie, PhD; Shayn Pierce-Cottler, PhD; and Jochen Zimmer, PhD.

New Chairs Receive Standardized Onboarding

With the arrival of several new chairs this year — Dr. Park (Otolaryngology), Dr. Saavedra (Dermatology), Dr. Zeiger (Surgery), Dr. Gampper (Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery), Dr. Hoard (Dentistry), Dr. Goodkin (Neurology) and myself (interim in Family Medicine) — the Dean’s Office has implemented a new onboarding process.

Each chair meets regularly with Dean Wilkes and me during their first three months. These meetings are essential in orienting chairs to their new role and the institution itself. They also provide an opportunity for regular check-ins and for us to develop a strong partnership with these new leaders. We offer advice on strategies for success and point out pitfalls to avoid, and connect the new chair with stakeholders within the Health System and across Grounds.

We also hold three monthly, half-day sessions for the new chairs and their administrators with focused topics such as clinical affairs, the education and research missions, finances and budgeting, promotion and tenure, faculty development, and HR-related items (recruitment, hiring, annual reviews, employee relations).

Why Standardize the Onboarding for Chairs?
We’re doing this for two reasons. The first is that we want the chairs to have a formal path to connect early with colleagues and to develop relationships with those with whom they’ll be working as department chairs. This onboarding fosters that network creation. The second is that departmental leadership is a demanding role essential to the success of the medical school. We want to offer the new chairs quick access to the information they need to get acclimated to their new role. “What do I need to know about the department’s finances, or the physical environment, or my responsibilities or …?” We help chairs answer those questions before they become issues.

A better-prepared chair — one who understands their responsibilities and establishes a strong, professional network within the Health System — will be able to better support the development and advancement of faculty as well as lead the department to advance the education, clinical, and research missions.

Thank you to Troy Buer, PhD, and Ashley Ayers who were crucial in launching this initiative.

For more information on department chair leadership, visit the Faculty Affairs and Development site.

Susan M. Pollart, MD, MS
Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor and Chair (interim) of Family Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development

Highlights: November MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean David S. Wilkes, MD

  • We learned a number of lessons from the DARs/CARs.
    • Accountability is key across all missions.
      • In education, we must ensure that students are prepared to perform the Entrustable Professional Activities.
      • In research, we must diversify the funding portfolios, maintain the standards for research funding per square foot of lab space, and maximize salary support on grants.
      • In the clinics, we must improve efficiencies across the board in the ambulatory setting and we must establish a group practice.
    • The reviews highlighted several priorities.
      • As leaders, we are all responsible for working together and guiding institutional change.
      • We must improve organizational structures and processes. In the dean’s office, we are doing this through developing business intelligence, improving IT infrastructure, and piloting the Be Smart initiative (lean processes).
      • We must build and strengthen external relationship across the University, through the Inova partnership, and through the CTSA initiative.
      • We will take education to a higher level through innovations in our graduate and master’s programs.
    • One of the programs we learned about in the DARs is the Silo Busters program in the Child Health Research Center (CHRC) in the Department of Pediatrics. James Nataro described Silo Busters for us.
      • The program is designed to facilitate interactions with basic scientists. Eligible basic scientists who will be working with Pediatrics faculty members are given joint appointments in the CHRC.
      • The research may be conducted in the lab of either the primary or the secondary appointee.
      • The objective is to attract basic scientists to work with clinicians.
      • The first Silo Buster recipients will be announced before the end of this year.

Bobby Chhabra, MD
The Department of Orthopedics’ clinical trials have grown from 4 trials in 2013 to more than 60 today. Over the last year, the clinical trials infrastructure has been fully supported by the overhead negotiated through the industry “rate card” mechanism.

Dr. Chhabra explained the methodology for developing the cost expectations for the rate card. It takes into account salary expenses (investigator and trial support staff) and OTPS. Billing may be based on an hourly rate or on trial enrollment and other milestones.

The rate card provides a process that is more streamlined and transparent for the budgeting process. It makes is easier for industry to set up trials. It provides salary support for MDs and PAs. The rate card helps to ensure that clinical revenues do not support the expenses of clinical trials.

VMED: Making Teaching and Learning Simpler

Making Virginia Medicine Better: (l-r) Dr. Megan Bray, Dr. Mary Kate Worden, Kim Holman, Dr. Maryellen Gusic, Robert Pastor, Dr. Randolph Canterbury, and Mark Moody.

Technology is supposed to make our lives easier and allow us to work faster or smarter; but it has to be the right technology, employed correctly. Too often we find some tech to be “good enough” and try to make it suit our needs. “Good enough” causes us to create Band-Aid solutions and workarounds which can translate to extra work and frustration. Over the years, the School of Medicine has been using a patchwork quilt of commercial and custom educational programs and software, added and modified where needed. We’re getting rid of them for something better.

The School of Medicine is in the process of building VMED, which stands for Virginia Medicine. This is an integrated learning-, curriculum-, and student-management system that is being designed with the specific needs of UVA in mind. We want to provide a seamless experience for students, faculty, and administration. With a system of our own design, we can build it to meet our needs instead of trying to muscle through the constraints of commercial software.

To build VMED, we started with the foundation of the UME NxGen Curriclum, the UVA 12 Competencies for the Contemporary Physician, which are our education program objectives for the MD degree. These competencies drive our educational activities and assessments, and VMED underpins those learning objectives and those, in turn, support our student management, online content delivery, assessments, gradebook, program evaluation, and much more. All of this assists us with our AAMC and LCME reporting and predictive analytics regarding our students’ USMLE performance. VMED, built from the ground up, also provides us with longitudinal data not only to assess our student performance but also provides us with program evaluation data necessary for continuous quality improvement

In simplest terms, we are replacing critical components in the student information system and think it will be a huge improvement for all. Student Source, Oasis, X-Credit, and Faculty Toolbox are a few of the current applications that are being replaced.

The largest pieces of VMED include:

  • the online testing system — Three classes of students are now using this.
  • a clinical assessment tool for undergraduate medical education — iCAN, which stands for Interactive Clinical Assessment Navigator, is the tool we use for assessing entrustable professional activities (EPA).
  • a learning management system for students — A home for resources, schedules, enrollment, and gradebook.
  • evaluations — Student-to-student, student-to-faculty, and student-to-course.
  • mapping of the curriculum — mapping to the physician competencies, which speaks to our accreditation as a medical school.

Most medical schools are using commercial products or open-source tools to deliver their curriculum to students and to map it for accreditation purposes. We’ll be joining a small community that is developing software from scratch. We’re moving forward with this because of the successes we’ve had with the new testing system and EPA programs — they are proof that we have the resources and the talent in the School of Medicine to build something that will suit our specific needs.

What Does This Mean for You?
We’re working on VMED now. Some modules have been piloted, but we’re also gathering requirements for future modules. The initial release of the learning management system will roll out in August 2018 with iterative releases to come in the months and years to follow.

Faculty who are teaching in the classroom or in the clinic have already seen some of these changes, particularly those using the assessment methodology for EPAs and those using the new online testing system. I hope that VMED will simplify teacher workflow for class preparation, approval of teaching materials, setting up exams, and reviewing student performance, and that it will offer faculty a clear view of how your work supports the physician competencies.

I would like to thank Dr. Megan Bray, Dr. Maryellen Gusic, Kim Holman, Mark Moody, Robert Pastor, Michael Szul, and Dr. Mary Kate Worden for their tireless efforts on VMED. It could not have happened without their hard work.

As more modules of VMED are ready for release, I’ll talk about them here. Stay tuned!

R.J. Canterbury, MD
Senior Associate Dean for Education
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor

Year 6: Excellence in Diversity Award

Dean David Wilkes

At times, I have to remind myself that some of our work is a marathon, not a sprint. But I find encouragement when I hear that, for the sixth year in a row, the University of Virginia School of Medicine has received the 2017 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award. Presented by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, this national honor recognizes U.S. medical, dental, pharmacy, osteopathic, nursing, and allied health schools that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

To receive this award six years in a row reflects our School’s dedication and commitment to diversity and inclusion. This is a great team effort. Our faculty, staff, and students consistently keep our core institutional values of respecting everyone at the forefront of what they do.

Our diversity efforts include:

  • Summer Medical Leadership Program. This six-week summer academic enrichment program brings together 30 college undergraduates interested in medical careers who are from disadvantaged backgrounds and underrepresented groups in medicine. The main goal is to expose participants to the “real world of medicine” to prepare them not only for admission to medical school but to assume future leadership positions in the medical field.
  • Partnerships with local schools. The School of Medicine hosts a Poster Symposium each year at Charlottesville High School to introduce high-school students — and future healthcare workers — to medical research. As part of their projects, students visit the UVA Claude Moore Health Sciences Library and are mentored by UVA research scientists.
  • Committee on Women. The committee promotes opportunities for mentoring and leadership for women throughout the School of Medicine, including an annual award honoring a faculty member for their leadership efforts.
  • Latino Health Initiative. In partnership with groups across UVA and the Charlottesville area, members work to improve health literacy, outcomes and access to care for local Latino residents. Ongoing projects include biweekly cardiovascular disease screening and education sessions, as well as training and empowerment for Latino community health workers.

I commend our faculty and staff for being dedicated to such an important effort. Special thanks to Dr. Greg Townsend, Associate Dean for Diversity. Each department has designated a diversity facilitator, and Greg has been meeting regularly with these facilitators to implement and promote diversity efforts in all departments. While there is still much to be done in the realm of diversity and inclusion, I feel like we are making positive strides every day. For that, I thank you all.

The University of Virginia School of Medicine will be featured, along with 23 other recipients, in the December 2017 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. For more information on the 2017 Health Professions HEED Award, click here. For more information about the School’s diversity initiatives, click here.

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Highlights: October MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean
David S. Wilkes, MD

  • Congratulations to Bradford Worrall, MD, for receiving a Fulbright Scholarship.
  • We are about halfway through the department and center annual reviews. Some of the early themes we have noticed:
    • In those departments with incentive plans that have a portion of the salary at risk for the quality of medical student teaching as judged by student evaluations, the student evaluations are higher.
    • The residency programs have had more success in recruiting women and underrepresented minorities.
    • Chairs are making progress in moving a higher percentage of compensation to base salaries with a lower percentage of compensation in incentives. This has important ramifications for retirement benefits.
  • Dean Wilkes welcomed Arturo P. Saavedra, MD, PhD, MBA, as the new chair of Dermatology.

Update on University/Health System Campaign
Anne Watkins and Amy Karr, Health System Development
We are in the quiet phase of the campaign and soliciting input from chairs and center directors. The formal kickoff will be in the summer/fall of 2019 with the campaign running through 2026. The working goal for the Health System is $1 billion.

September Health System Board Update
Bobby Chhabra, MD
Dr. Chhabra shared highlights from the September 13, 2017, HSB meeting. The HS goals dashboard for FY18 showed strong performance with two green indicators and the remaining ones yellow. Likewise, the Medical Center FY17 year-end balanced scorecard showed excellent progress in all areas except one (voluntary turnover).

The next meeting will be Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, in the MEB Learning Studio.

A Year in Review

Dean David Wilkes

The other day while my wife and I were having morning coffee, we realized that I’m starting my third year as dean of the School of Medicine! We talked about how quickly the first two years have passed, how much we love Charlottesville, and how happy I am at UVA — and what an incredible honor it is to serve as your dean.

In some respects, my role is like that of an orchestra conductor because I’m not the one actually making the music. I only facilitate and fully recognize that you are the ones doing the real work.

When we’re focused on the urgent tasks of each day, it’s easy to forget where we’ve been and what we’ve done. We’ve done a lot! This letter mentions only a few highlights. Because we have so many accomplishments to celebrate, I’ve added this link where you can see what we’ve achieved in specific areas.

UVA moved from 40 to 36 in the NIH rankings of schools of medicine, as reported by the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research! Congratulations to all of you who worked hard on writing grants and preparing the submissions! Our FY17 extramural funding was $221 million … our highest level ever, excluding ARRA. This is remarkable growth from $162 million in FY14 and is truly a cause for celebration. The data also show that we are diversifying our research portfolio to spread risk and to create opportunity for further success. Related to this, we have just contracted with The Conafay Group to help us improve our chances of success with funding from the Department of Defense and related federal agencies.

UVA and Inova executed an academic affiliation agreement to establish the Genomics and Bioinformatics Research Institute (GBRI) on the former Exxon campus in Fairfax. We’re just in the early stages of setting this up and it will be a game changer. The affiliation agreement also establishes the UVA School of Medicine — Inova Campus where 72 of our students will complete their 3rd and 4th years in a high-volume, urban environment to begin in 2021. The School of Medicine has taken a lead position in what we anticipate to be a more broad expansion of UVA into northern Virginia.

In September 2016 we renamed Jordan Hall to Pinn Hall, and recently we held the dedication ceremony. A group of SOM leaders identified UVA alumna Dr. Vivian Pinn as the ideal choice for representing excellence in clinical care, research, scholarship, and the character and personal qualities we value. Phased renovations on Pinn Hall have begun. In addition to providing modern, open, flexible laboratories, Pinn Hall will house a Nobel Atrium to honor the Nobel laureates who did their pioneering work at UVA — thus highlighting our future by recognizing stars who represent what is best about us.

We are starting our third year of a tuition freeze. Nationally, medical students are completing their programs with staggering levels of debt. Thanks to the support of our alumni and the scholarship programs they fund, our students graduate with an average debt level that is much lower than the national average. Freezing tuition, while helping to reduce student debt, results from sound fiscal stewardship at the School of Medicine.

For the second year in a row, the University of Virginia Medical Center was recognized as the number one hospital in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Six specialties (Cancer, Ear, Nose & Throat, Orthopedics, Urology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, and Cardiology & Heart Surgery) were ranked in the top 50. And Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, Nephrology, Neurology & Neurosurgery, and Pulmonology were called out as being “high performing” specialties. Congratulations to our caregivers, researchers, and staff for this recognition of your work!

Our accrediting agency, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, is monitoring our success in increasing diversity among our faculty. While our URM faculty increased from 4.8% to 5.3% we still have much work left to achieve the AAMC 50th percentile of 6.7%.  Now each department has a diversity plan that maps out a strategy and tactics to increase diversity among faculty and trainees.

I also want to share some information that makes a strong statement about our organization. As we continue to move as one Health System, it’s important to note that our partners in the Medical Center contributed $70.1 million in FY17 to the SOM for academic support. This is a significant and tangible statement of our partnership and of the shared trust between the individual entities of the Health System.

As I said, these are just some of the highlights. Clearly, we — that’s all of you! — have been doing a lot and accomplishing great things.

The events of August 11-12 created a lot of anxiety and uncertainty. We can get mired in the confusion or we can recognize something crucial — we are defined by who we are and what our values are, and not by the events of August. The importance of our work hasn’t changed. Let’s focus on our mission and our excellence. When someone asks where you’re from, you can stand a little taller and say, “I’m from the University of Virginia. I’m from Charlottesville.” And say it with pride, because you know who you are.

I’m very excited about what we are going to do together in the coming years. Although I’ve shared my priorities with you before, this is a good time to share them again.

  • Execute the development of the UVA-Inova Genomics Institute.
  • Operationalize the regional medical school campus for UVA 3rd and 4th year medical students at Inova.
  • Continue an aggressive investment in research and faculty recruitment.
  • Increase our NIH portfolio to $150 million by 2020.

This will take a lot of heavy lifting, but based on what we’ve already accomplished, I know we can do it. Every day we have the opportunity to do our best and every day I see the results of our efforts. My thanks to each one of you.

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

See all accomplishments at https://news.med.virginia.edu/blog/deans-anniversary-letter/

Highlights: September MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean

  • Dean Wilkes recognized some noteworthy accomplishments that impact the entire Health System.
    • US News & World Report identified UVA as the number 1 hospital in Virginia for the second year in a row. Along with this, six specialties were included in the Top 50: Cancer (30); Ear, Nose & Throat (32); Orthopedics (33); Urology (35); Diabetes & Endocrinology (44); and Cardiology & Heart Surgery (50). Also, Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, Nephrology, Neurology & Neurosurgery, and Pulmonology were identified as “Top Performers.”
    • UVA has achieved Comprehensive Stroke Center status, one of only three institutions in Virginia to have earned this status.
    • The SOM saw a 42% increase in the number of women professors over two years. For the first time, the SOM is at the national average for women professors.
  • Dean Wilkes welcomed three new department chairs:
    • Martha A. Zeiger, MD – Surgery
    • Stephen S. Park, MD – Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery
    • Susan M. Pollart, MD – Family Medicine (Interim)
  • On the occasion of his second anniversary at UVA, Dean Wilkes reviewed his priorities:
    • Execute development of the Inova/UVA Genomics Institute.
    • Develop the regional medical school campus at Inova for 3rd and 4th year medical students.
    • Continue aggressive investment in research and faculty recruitment.
    • Increase our NIH portfolio to $150 million by 2020.

Health System Financial Overview
Douglas Lischke, Chief Accounting Officer

Mr. Lischke provided an unaudited review of the FY17 consolidated Health System financials.

Draft Policy: Standards for Laboratory and Computational Space Use
Margaret A. Shupnik, PhD

Dr. Shupnik invited comments and feedback regarding this policy, which was distributed to chairs and directors in advance of the meeting. She thanked the Research Space Committee (composed of David Brautigan, PhD; Douglas DeSimone, PhD; Myla Goldman, MD; Russ Manley; Wladek Minor, PhD; James Nataro, MD, PhD, MBA; and Stephen Rich, PhD) for their year-long efforts developing the draft policy.

The committee, which is advisory to the dean, will oversee space reassignment and requests for additional space. Initially the committee is reviewing laboratory and computational space with metrics for clinical space to be developed later.

The SOM’s facilities team will conduct periodic assessments. It is recognized that:

  • space allocations are not permanent;
  • chairs and center directors are responsible for stewardship and will manage space in alignment with the policy; they will manage the space as a whole, including strategic decisions and decisions regarding individual assignments;
  • space reallocation agreements between units require dean’s office approval; and
  • vacant space will be reassigned.

Based on an external engineering report, the committee agreed on the following standards:

  • Grade A space – $500/SF
  • Grade B space – $400/SF
  • Grade C space – $300/SF

(Definitions of graded space have been sent to chairs, directors, and administrators and will be posted on the Office for Research website after the policy has been approved.)

A Research Investigator within a team of 6 FTEs and meeting the standards will be assigned approximately 1,270 SF lab space.

The policy will be phased in according to the quality of space. All space is subject to the defined metrics, which are based on a 3-year rolling average. Departments verify their space annually.

Summary statement – August 11-12 events

Dean David S. Wilkes

Dean Wilkes observed that some consider Charlottesville has been “branded” based on the August events. He reminded everyone that we will not be defined by external events that we have no control over, and that we should be proud of who we are and the excellent results of our work.

Do You Know Where to Turn for Help?

Brad Holland, University of Virginia Ombuds

The University has a powerful resource ready to offer help.

Do you have a work-related challenge or need advice with an issue? Do you need an objective listener who can help you address a problem? It may be time for you to reach out to Brad Holland, University of Virginia Ombuds.

The University Ombuds is an independent, confidential* resource available to assist faculty, staff, and students in resolving problems, complaints, conflicts, and other issues when normal processes and procedures have not worked satisfactorily.

Now it’s even more convenient to speak with Holland. In response to incidents across the Health System, he is now holding regular office hours every Tuesday in McKim 1173, from 1-5 p.m.

Ombuds services include listening to your problems and concerns, and exploring options to resolve them; focusing the attention of University officials on the complaint; making inquiries into concerns already heard but not satisfactorily resolved; providing information on resources within the University that may help you; serving as a neutral party to solve problems and resolve conflict (without taking sides); and identifying problem areas facing faculty, staff, and students and recommending changes in University policies and procedures.

Holland says that his job is to help people solve issues themselves. “I can help people find where to get help,” says Holland. “If they don’t want to go to those places or, if after they’ve gone to those places they are still unhappy I’ll try to help in other ways. When people come to see me, I listen. I ask questions. I get a feel for what’s going on. Together, we brainstorm what we can do to address the problem. Sometimes I help two people come together to talk about their issues, so that they may come to solution that works out for all parties. I am willing to do whatever I can to assist.”

Hollland wants you to know that he is available to help. You can reach him by email or via phone at 434.924.7819. You can visit him in his McKim 1173 office on Tuesday afternoons or at 2015 Ivy Rd, room 305. Holland is also willing to meet people wherever they want; on the Corner, in their department, or anywhere on or off Grounds. “I want people to feel that they have an option to come to me, and that we can address a problem without making a Federal case out of it. I find that people want to fix things and I like to help them find those real solutions.”

For more information, visit www.eocr.virginia.edu/ombuds.
*confidential, except for Title IX (sex/gender) disclosures

Susan M. Pollart, MD, MS
Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor of Family Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development