Highlights: May MAC Meeting

Chair Update (Dean David Wilkes)

  • Dean Wilkes announced that, as of July 1, Brian Hoard, DDS, will be Chair of the Department of Dentistry.
  • Michael Dong

    UVA School of Medicine student Michael Dong is one of only 79 students nationwide to be accepted into the prestigious Medical Research Fellows Program at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The program provides a stipend and other funding that allows med students to take a year off from their studies for in-depth, mentored biomedical research. Mr. Dong will conduct his research in Dr. Jonathan Kipnis’ lab.

Grant Support Index (Margaret Shupnik, PhD)

  • Background: There are new guidelines being discussed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that may limit grant support to individual principal investigators. The reasoning for this is that there are too many researchers and too few dollars. As of today, 10 percent of PIs have 40 percent of the resources. Additionally, the scientific workforce is aging more rapidly than the general work force. The current system affects young PIs disproportionately.
  • Shupnik shared that on May 2, 2017, the NIH announced that in order to protect sustainability of the research enterprise it is working on guidelines to limit the number of awards going to successful PIs. It is important to note two things:
    • The NIH will not defund any grants.
    • This only applies only to NIH awards.
  • There is a proposal in place that would take effect for grants submitted in the fall of 2017. This new process would be based on a “grant support index.” (GSI) The GSI is a function of the number of “R01 equivalents” — not dollars or percent effort on R01s.
  • Shupnik noted that there are many unknowns with this new system. Unanswered questions include:
    • How will multi-PI grants will be scored?
    • How will large, complex grants be counted?
    • How will smaller grants or institutional grants be scored?
    • Additionally: There may be institute-specific aspects to this process.
  • NIH is soliciting input from the scientific community.
    • Updates can be found on “Open Mike,” Mike Lauer’s blog on the NIH website: https://nexus.od.nih.gov/all/category/blog/
    • For previous discussions, refer to the May 2 and January 26 blogs — “Research Commitment Index”.
  • This is still an open discussion at the NIH. Dr. Shupnik, Dean Wilkes, and Dr. Shannon urged chairs to share with their faculty that now is the time to come forth with ideas.
  • Given this new process, Dean Wilkes urged for more diversification of our research portfolio, and to look to other agencies and sources of funds.
  • Please share this information with faculty.

Be Wise (Margaret Plews-Ogan, MD)

  • Be Wise is a Health System-wide effort to allow us to do our best at work and be our best at work. The program will:
    • Enhance individual resilience and interpersonal communication
    • Identify and reduce unnecessary stressors
    • Recognize caregiver stress and know how to respond
  • This leads to improved caregiver wellbeing and the ability to do our best work together.
  • The two arms to Be Wise are prevention and intervention.
  • Over past few months, Be Wise has developed coaching resources. These include: critical conversations, a conversation framework, attention/awareness, self-mastery, stress assessment, communication skills, and resilience practices.
  • Plews-Ogan shared how best to use the coaches. She asked chairs to invite the coaches to your department or division to deliver presentations or workshops on communication, resilience practices, and the stress continuum.
  • With Dr. Randolph Canterbury’s assistance, Be Wise has developed the Henry Harrison Wilson award. This award — run by students — encourages medical students to catch faculty in the process of doing something well, with regards to the humanistic delivery of healthcare.
  • Plews-Ogan also shared that as part of the Be Wise initiative there is an interdisciplinary committee working on helping people to respond effectively to discriminatory behavior whether from patients, visitors, staff or faculty. The Be Wise program will also include promoting the existing disclosure and peer-support program. Chairs can contact Dr. John Schorling for any of these coaching resources.
  • A Be Wise website with resources is coming soon.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, June 13, 2017, in the BIMS classroom.

Getting Ready for One Patient, One Record

The goal of “one patient, one record” has been a glimmer in the eyes of UVA Health System administrators and clinicians for years. With the launch of Epic Phase 2 on July 1, our toolbox will finally include a completely integrated electronic medical record system that providers across our continuum of care will use.

Getting ready for this big change requires extensive preparation. Groups across the Health System are preparing to use the nine new applications to go live during Epic Phase 2, and thousands of team members are now engaged in online, classroom and personalized training.

As Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer, Chris Ghaemmaghami, MD, reminds in this month’s special video message on UVA Connect, clinical teams are playing a crucial role in defining new workflows, and it is important for them to work hand-in-hand with operations and the Epic team. Such collaboration is essential to making our push toward one patient, one record a success. Acknowledging that change is disruptive, Dr. Ghaemmaghami notes that it has a positive purpose: “It is how we stay at the forefront of care and continue delivering our best for our patients.”

[Note: Video is internal-only. Access while on the Health System network.]

Photo: JFDP Deliver Scholarly Projects

Back in February, we wrote about the Junior Faculty Development Program. This is a program that provides networking, social opportunities, and peer mentoring among colleagues who are at a similar stage in their career; promotes the development and advancement of junior faculty through seminars and mentored scholarly projects; and facilitates mentoring relationships between senior and junior faculty.

On April 19, the first cohort of 12 junior faculty members presented their scholarly projects.

From left to right:

  • Kelly G. Gwathmey, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology
  • Kelly B. Mahaney, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery
  • Laahn H. Foster, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Michael K. Keng, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Jeanetta W. Frye, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Jonathan S. Black, MD, Assistant Professor of Plastic Surgery
  • Sana F. Khan, MBBS, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Amanda M. Kleiman, MD, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
  • Gilbert R. Kinsey, DPHARM, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Simon J. Lehtinen, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Sula Mazimba, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Anuj Singla, MBBS, Instructor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Congratulations to all!

Slides: Spring General Faculty Meeting

If you missed the April 20 General Faculty Meeting — or if you attended and just want to review! — you can find a PDF of the presentation slides here.

Highlights: April MAC Meeting

som-bldg_NEW_12122014New World Order in Hospitals … and Academic Medical Centers

  • Dean David Wilkes discussed that, given the degree of uncertainty with the healthcare landscape, we need to be conservative about new clinical hires until we understand how possible changes will affect us. Other institutions are performing workforce lay-offs — that is not a position in which we want to find ourselves.
  • Given the precarious nature of the budget at the National Institutes of Health, Dean Wilkes said that we should pursue only funded, mid-level or senior investigators.
  • Dean Wilkes reiterated that while we will be fine, we need to exercise caution in our hiring. Clarity on these issues will surface in the coming months.

March Board of Visitors Update

  • Background: In the fall of 2016, Dr. Chhabra was appointed as faculty representative to the Medical Center Operating Board (MCOB) of the Board of Visitors. As standard practice going forward, Dr. Chhabra will report to the MAC highlights from the MCOB meetings.
  • From the March MCOB meeting:
    • Health System Dashboard update
      • Positive changes include success in Be Well Phase 2, an increase in referral patterns, and the recruitment of 5 new physician-scientists.
    • Finance update
      • Positive operating margin was reviewed and explained.
    • Epic Phase 2 update
      • Reviewed timeline and implementation plan. The Health System is on track for a summer launch.
    • Be Safe Approach and Outcomes
      • Reviewed service line accountability and provided an example of heart and vascular center success for STEMI patients, a significant improvement when compared to our peers.
    • Strategy update
      • Richard Shannon provided updates on why patients want to see clinical outcomes that matter, sharing publicly available clinical data, our progress in the Joint Operating Agreement (JOC) with Novant, developing a statewide pediatric care network, and progress on the developing academic relationship with Inova.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, May 9, 2016, in the BIMS classroom.

How did you celebrate St. MATCHrick’s Day?

UVa_SOM_Match_Day_17_e4636On St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 149 members of the UVA School of Medicine’s Class of 2017 tore open envelopes and learned where they would be heading for additional training as residents.

I could not be more proud of them. Every year seems to be more and more competitive and yet our students always rise to the challenge. The below list shows how the residency spots filled out, by specialty:

  • Anesthesiology | 6
  • Dermatology | 2
  • Emergency Medicine | 11
  • Family Medicine | 9
  • General Surgery | 11
  • Internal Medicine | 36
  • Interventional Radiology | 2
  • Neurological Surgery | 3
  • Neurology | 3
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology (incl prelim) | 7
  • Ophthalmology | 4
  • Orthopaedics | 4
  • Otolaryngology | 4
  • Pathology | 3
  • Pediatrics | 18
  • Physical Med/Rehab | 2
  • Plastic Surgery | 1
  • Psychiatry | 4
  • Radiology/Diagnostic | 10
  • Radiology Oncology | 2
  • Urology | 2

This list represents many great matches to top-rated institutions such as Duke, Mass. General, Yale, Stanford, Northwestern, Brigham & Women’s, Vanderbilt, UCSF, Cornell, Beth Israel Deaconess, University of Washington, and Johns Hopkins. While our students do all of the heavy lifting during their medical education career, I would like to thank our faculty and staff for training and supporting them for four years. Results from Match Days like this should make you feel great — it certainly does for me.

While I will miss the students who are leaving, I find comfort in knowing that 21 of our graduates chose to stay in Charlottesville, doing all or part of their residency program here at the University of Virginia. I look forward to seeing them around the School and the Medical Center.

Please join me in thanking our colleagues at the Medical Alumni Association for hosting such a terrific Match Day event and in congratulating these 149 students!

R.J. Canterbury, MD
Senior Associate Dean for Education

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Highlights: March MAC Meeting

som-bldg_NEW_12122014Opening Comments from the Dean

  • US News & World Report: The dean congratulated our faculty on their work that resulted in the School of Medicine moving from 28 to 27 for research and from 25 to 24 for primary care.
  • Dean Wilkes reported on two strategic hires, Dr. Francine Garrett-Bakelman (genomic studies of leukemia and head of the NASA “twins project”) and Dr. José Oberholzer (Director of the Charles O. Strickler Transplant Center).

Budget Update

  • Kathy Peck reported that the budget review shows significant increases in costs, especially those related to new hires. The budget team will circle back to the departments for a closer look prior to the April 4 submission date.

Managing the Research Portfolio

  • Anita Clayton, chair, and Michelle Storer, Director of Research Administration, from the department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences discussed the management of their faculty research portfolios.
  • The program is a robust, pro-active, and successful tool for PIs and grant administration alike. It assumes research time is fully funded, provides for detailed quarterly reviews, encourages diversification and collaboration, and offers early identification of potential trouble and follow-up planning. Streamlined access to necessary information/forms, SOPs, policies and deadlines that support an effective grant application and administration process, and a flexible, solution-focused approach keeps research funded and moving forward.
  • Contact Michelle Storer for details.

Faculty Diversity

  • Susan Pollart thanked those who have submitted their diversity plans. She reminded us that the LCME is monitoring us in the area of diversity and specifically will want to know how we are doing with the search for a Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer (CDIO) and how well we are doing in recruiting URM faculty.
  • She identified several promising practices that departments may wish to emulate and will circulate information about these practices in an upcoming email.
  • Each department facilitator will receive an edited version of their plan in the coming week. The next steps are to finalize the department plans and submit current year, one year, and three year goals.
  • The CDIO search will begin in the next few weeks.

This Is a Blog About the Blog

blogaboutblog_03162017Another revolution around the sun has come and gone. This month marks the one-year anniversary of the Dean’s Office Blog. The blog was created to help increase the quality and consistency of communication from my office. It is meant to provide faculty and staff with an additional channel of information to learn about important news that affects your work and the School of Medicine at large.

In the last year we have published 42 stories on strategic hires, notes from the Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) meetings, innovative methods in promoting research and enhancing education, funding opportunities, safety measures, and more.

But it has been a year, so I’d like to ask: Does this site work for you?

In looking at the site’s analytics, it appears to me that faculty and staff are, indeed, visiting, reading, and (sometimes) commenting. The Dean’s Office Blog has had nearly 29,000 pageviews and over 5,800 readers. And, while numbers do not lie, they rarely tell the whole story.

Can you help fill in the gaps of this story?

I’d like to know your thoughts. Please post a comment below and let me know how this site could be improved, what topics you would like to read about, and where we can make adjustments so that you are better served over the next 365 days and beyond.

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

[As of May 18, comments have been turned off due to spam. If you have a comment to post, please email Brian Murphy at bpm3q@virginia.edu.]

Highlights: February MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean

  • The Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research publishes rankings of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant dollars rewarded to medical schools. Dean Wilkes announced the School of Medicine moved from 40th to 35th and thanked the faculty and staff who had a part in this achievement.
  • Dean Wilkes announced the strategic hires who will be starting soon at the School of Medicine.
    • May 1: Philip Bourne, PhD, Director, Data Science Institute (from NIH).
    • March 1: Francine Garrett-Bakelman, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine-Hem/Onc and Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics (from Cornell University SOM).
    • July 1: Ananda Basu, MD, and Rita Basu, MD, Professors of Medicine (Endocrinology) (from Mayo Clinics).
    • March 1: José Oberholzer, MD, Director, Charles O. Strickler Transplant Center (from University of Illinois).
  • Dean Wilkes introduced Lynne Boyle, Federal Relations Professional, Office of the Executive Vice President of Health Affairs.

Department Diversity Plans

  • Dr. Susan Pollart thanked the 28 departments that have submitted their diversity plans.
  • Next steps: Dr. Pollart will be in contact with the department facilitators to refine the plans and request action steps for the coming year.
  • Reminder: The Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program Scholars application process is open now. Deadline March 15. virginia.edu/diversity/resources/awards/

Be Wise

  • Drs. Margaret Plews-Ogan, Raymond Costabile, and Norman Oliver presented Be Wise, a program to create a welcoming and healthy workplace throughout the Health System. Be Wise creates a defined mechanism to help people be their best selves, so that we can give the best care possible to our patients.
  • Be Wise aims to enhance individual resilience and interpersonal communication; to identify and reduce unnecessary stressors; and to recognize caregiver stress and know how to respond.
  • Two key components are prevention and intervention. It is important to note that this is a supportive and restorative process, not a punitive one.
  • Next steps: Dr. Plews-Ogan will gather individuals for clarity on Be Wise processes. Please send any feedback on the flowchart (distributed at the meeting and via email) to her.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, March 14, 2017, in the BIMS Classroom.

Do You Know About the JFDP?

Last October the School of Medicine welcomed its first cohort into the Junior Faculty Development Program (JFDP). Modeled after successful programs at Pennsylvania State University and the University of Massachusetts, the UVA program is designed to:

  • provide networking, social opportunities, and peer mentoring among colleagues who are at a similar stage in their career;
  • promote the development and advancement of junior faculty through seminars and mentored scholarly projects; and
  • facilitate mentoring relationships between senior and junior faculty.

Each participant in the JFDP works on a scholarly project over course of the program and has access to a mentor who will answer questions, provide resources, and assist in their growth. Our junior faculty have devised an amazingly diverse set of topics for their projects, such as “Regulatory T Cells in Cardiac Surgery-Associated Acute Kidney Injury,” “Individualizing the Care of Children with Facial and Skull Birth Defects using computer-based simulation for surgical optimization,” “Quality improvement project focused toward improved care of peritoneal dialysis patients in the ER,” and many others. All participants will make a presentation on their project at the end of the JFDP.

The first cohort of 12 junior faculty members come to the program from a variety of departments — medicine, neurology, anesthesiology, plastic surgery, neurosurgery, orthopaedics — and they meet twice a month for two hours. (While the current cohort does not represent every department, I do want to make it clear that this program is open to all clinical and basic science faculty.) The JFDP is organized through my office and spans a large portion of the academic school year.

This is a wonderful opportunity for our junior faculty to learn and grow and for our senior faculty to pass along vital knowledge and experience. The inaugural cohort will be finishing in the next couple of months and I look forward to their feedback. If you’re interested in applying for the 2017-18 program, more information will be provided this spring. If you have questions, please contact either me or Troy Buer, PhD, Director of Faculty Development, or visit the website.

Susan M. Pollart, MD, MS
Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor of Family Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development