Connecting to the Waiting Patient: Solving a Supply Problem

The primary goal of the School of Medicine dean’s office is to make sure that our efforts enable the School’s tri-partite mission of education, research, and clinical care, and benefit the “waiting” patient. It is the patient who is waiting for a cure, the next generation of physicians, or an appointment with a physician who can deliver needed care.

The dean’s office employees are focused on improving administrative processes that support the faculty’s work. The Be Smart program creates a meaningful framework for us to utilize Lean methodology for process improvement, standard work, problem solving, and data-driven decision making. This allows us to be more efficient and put limited resources where they can best support our mission.

As our January example, below is a short video story about how a team’s decision to solve a problem in the ordering of the medical supplies in the Clinical Trials Office helped them feel better about the process and add precious moments to the patient needs in the clinical research units.

It’s exciting and inspiring to hear about the ways people have improved their processes, saved money, saved time, or otherwise contributed to our shared mission. What improvements have YOU made? I want to hear about them! Or, if you think you can improve something in your work, tell us about it. We want to hear, support you and celebrate it with you.

Thanks for listening! I’ll continue to share more stories with you.

Katherine L. Peck, MBA
Chief Operating Officer

Next Capital Campaign Is Off to a Great Start

Researchers, educators, clinicians, and students all benefit from philanthropic support.

At the October General Faculty Meeting, Karen Rendleman, Senior Associate Vice President for Health System Development and Executive Director of the UVA Health Foundation,shared that the next capital campaign, Honor the Future: The Campaign for the University of Virginia, is off to a great start. This campaign will officially launch in October 2019, but has been tallying gifts since the end of the last campaign four years ago. The overarching goal is to raise $5 billion by 2025, which will allow the University to bolster strategic objectives in service of the greater good.

The Health System’s portion of Honor the Future is called The Campaign for Health and has a $1 billion goal to support initiatives in patient care, research, and medical and nursing education across the Health System. While we’re still in the silent phase of the campaign, it’s impressive to know that $337 million in gifts, pledges, and philanthropic grants have come to the School of Medicine, Medical Center, and School of Nursing. This includes $72M in future support, which are bequest intentions or other planned gifts that will be realized in the future.

Also included in the new gifts are $114M in private philanthropic grants, which are investigator-initiated and are counted in the campaign totals as is standard industry practice.

What does this mean for our mission? Philanthropic support seeds novel projects, supports clinical trials, and helps advance research at all stages. We are able to attract and retain the best faculty and researchers through professorships and other endowments. Our students benefit from lower debt through scholarship support. And our patients thrive from initiatives that enhance the patient experience. The gifts and pledges of future support touch areas such as Cancer ($41M), Children’s Hospital ($19M), or Neurosciences/Neurology (nearly $15M), and extend across the entire Health System. Our benefactors give both outright expendable gifts and endowed gifts. More than $60M in endowed gifts have come in so far. These endowments support not only professorships, scholarships and fellowships, but also groundbreaking research.

It is important to remember that most of the dollars that come in via philanthropy are restricted and designated for a particular use. Donors give for a specific reason or to a particular cause. We appreciate any amount, and in any way, we receive support. As part of the campaign planning effort, we are working closely with Karen and her team on defining our School of Medicine priorities and goals around both restricted and unrestricted funds.

Who Gives? And Why?
To date, 30,051 donors have supported the School of Medicine and the Medical Center. Their particular reasons for giving are as singular as the individuals themselves, but the common theme is you.

Grateful patients give back in honor of the exemplary care they received at UVA; alumni give back to support an institution that prepared them for their careers; and friends, community members, and other University alumni see the exciting work we’re doing and want to be a part of it. All of our donors see a need and want to help. They are inspired by the skill, dedication, and compassion of our faculty and staff across the entire Health System. Here’s a breakdown of who has given so far:

  • 8,028 University alumni ($51.9M)
  • 112 family foundations ($9.6M)
  • 70 estates ($29.8M)
  • 19,519 friends ($52.9M)
  • 2,322 parents ($10.2M)
  • 2,534 corporations, foundations, and other organizations ($147.3M)

That’s a lot of numbers. Here are a couple of examples that illustrate philanthropy’s impact.

  • School of Medicine alumnus Allen Hogge and his wife, Joan, took advantage of the University’s Bicentennial Scholarship matching program to endow a scholarship. The Hogges both benefitted from scholarship support when they were in college and wanted to help the University recruit the best students. This type of private support is critical to reducing our students’ debt.
  • Family foundations, like the Ivy Foundation and the Manning Family Foundation, accelerate research discovery across the Health System. These two foundations alone provide more than $750,000 in annual support for research projects.

Thank you to our faculty and staff who make this important work possible. These gifts reflect your exceptional efforts and your partnership with our Development team. Special thanks to Karen and her team for helping us fund our missions.

If you have questions about philanthropy, or how you can help, please contact Anne Watkins, Assistant Vice President & Chief Development Officer, School of Medicine.

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Highlights: December MAC Meeting

The School of Medicine’s Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) met on Dec. 11, 2018, 4-5 p.m., in the Medical Education Building’s Learning Studio. Here are highlights from that meeting:

Opening Comments
David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean

Drs. DeSimone, Minor, and Tamm: Newly elected AAAS Fellows.

Dean Wilkes gave enthusiastic congratulations to Drs. James Nataro, Douglas DeSimone, Wladek Minor, and Lukas Tamm. The Latin American Congress of Microbiology held a special symposium in honor of Dr. Nataro for his work battling infectious diseases, such as E. coli and Shigella, in Latin America. Drs. DeSimone, Minor, and Tamm were elected as Fellows by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Each year the AAAS elects members whose “efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications are scientifically or socially distinguished.” 

December Health System Board Update
A. Bobby Chhabra, MD
Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery
Dr. Chhabra reviewed the Health System’s FY19 Scorecard and provided a summary of the FY19 first quarter financial report. 

The Health System Development (HSD) report showed that $67.7 million was brought in, exceeding the goal of $62 million. The grants and gifts include $17.6 million in investigator-initiated philanthropic grants, some of which were the Bill and Melinda Gate Foundation ($9.4 million — Houpt, Moore, Petri, Nataro), the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation ($450,000 — Rutkowski), and the American Heart Association ($706,511 — Bilchick, Sun, McNamara). HSD is well on its way toward its FY19 goal of $100 million, with commitments that include $7.74 million for cancer research pilot projects, $1.62 million for clinical trials space, $1.25 million for biomedical research, and $2 million for a neurology fellowship and a general medicine professorship. 

Getting Ready for Workday
Julie Bird
UFirst Change Management Co-Lead
Ms. Bird reviewed key dates related to the January 7, 2019, launch of Workday, UVA’s new, cloud-based human resource and payroll system. Duo and the latest version of Internet Explorer or Google Chrome are required to access Workday. 

  • SOM monthly payrolls will be paid from the legacy system on December 31 and from Workday on February 1. 
  • SOM bi-weekly payrolls will be paid from the legacy system on December 28 and from Workday on January 11.
  • January 4 is the last day for time/absence entry and approval for the 12/14/18-1/6/19 time period. Those working that weekend will estimate their time for January 5 and 6 and, if necessary, make a correction the following time period.
  • W-2s for 2018 will be available through the legacy system.

If you have questions: 

Please see the Workday website, workday.hr.virginia.edu. 

Highlighting New Faculty
Jonathan Kipnis, PhD
Chair of Neuroscience
Dr. Chia-Yi (Alex) Kuan, MD, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience, received his MD from National Taiwan University (1989) and his PhD from Yale (1997). He is currently PI on three R01s and one R21. Dr. Kuan’s research interests are neonatal brain injury, stroke, and brain energetics. 

Dr. Ukpong Eyo, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, received his PhD (2012) from the University of Iowa. He did his postdoctoral research at Rutgers University and the Mayo Clinic, investigating microglial-neuronal physical interactions especially in the hyperactive brain using real-time two photon imaging. He has published numerous articles, including eleven as first author. His research is concentrated on the role of microglia in epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. 

The next meeting will be Tuesday, January 8, 2018, in the BIMS Classroom.

Share Your Story of Community Engagement

The School of Medicine faculty have always been engaged with our community in meaningful ways. Through the Engaged UVA website, a product of the Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Research, faculty can share information about their community outreach work. The website is a repository of stories of research and teaching in partnership with communities in pursuit of the public good.

It is important to note that, in this context, “community” is used broadly and can mean local to Charlottesville or refer to the other side of the world. The site has a fantastic mapping function, “Where We Work,” that is a powerful reminder of the University’s global reach. I’m eager to see how the maps fill out as faculty add their work to the site.

The criteria for including projects on the website are:

  • a UVA faculty member must be involved
  • a community partner must be involved
  • the initiative or project must run at least two semesters

Many School of Medicine faculty projects meet these criteria. I would love for the SOM to be well-represented in this showcase. Scrolling through the site today, I see Dr. Becca Dillingham and the Center for Global Health; Dr. David Burt and the UVA-Guatemala Initiative; Ruth Gaare Bernheim and the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life; and Maurice Apprey and the “Impact of Civil Engagement.”

Visit engageduva.virginia.edu to learn more. If your work meets the above guidelines, please reach out to Mary Allen at mea4ue@virginia.edu. She will assist in gathering the requisite information.

Susan M. Pollart, MD, MS
Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor and Chair (interim) of Family Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development

Wilkes: School of Medicine Year in Review

Dean David Wilkes

Dear Colleagues: Cruising through the mountains on my bicycle is a great way to clear my head, slow my thinking, and contemplate how much there is to appreciate — such as the beauty of the forest and the valleys, the serenity of being in nature, and the joy that comes from doing what I am passionate about.

Something else that I’m passionate about is serving you in my role of dean. I am so proud of what our faculty and staff do each day to ensure that our patients and our learners have the best experience possible. As I begin my fourth year as dean, I am grateful for what we have accomplished together. Below are some of the highlights that come to my mind. Please remember these are some of the highlights, and is not all inclusive of the many great things that have occurred. So, I will welcome you to comment and let me know what you and your colleagues have done that’s missing from the list!

Match Day 2018

Education
We had a wildly successful Match Day, with 99% of our students matching. Students are going to Yale, Emory, Penn, Vanderbilt, Wake Forest, Johns Hopkins, Mass General, and other high-quality institutions. The most popular programs were internal medicine, emergency medicine, ob/gyn, pediatrics, and anesthesiology.

Thanks to the support of our alumni and donors, we are able to provide scholarships that allow our students to graduate with an average debt level that is lower than the national average. And thanks to sound fiscal stewardship, the School is entering its fourthyear of a tuition freeze. Our goal is no tuition increase through 2021.

The McIntire School of Commerce is collaborating with us on a leadership track in the medical school curriculum and has partnered with us to develop a leadership program for graduate students and faculty. These programs will differentiate us from other medical schools while helping our students and faculty learn the skills and qualities needed to flourish as leaders in the field of healthcare.

The education partnership with Inova reached another milestone when all three of the state and national oversight agencies granted formal approval to establish the UVA School of Medicine Inova Campus in Fairfax. The entering class of 2019 will be the first to have the option to complete their third and fourth years at the Inova Campus.

Our medical school class continues to be among the most diverse in the nation. For the sixth year in a row, the SOM received the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from INSIGHT Into Diversitymagazine. And again, our entering class ranks in the 96th percentile academically of all medical students in the United States.

Since the inception of the graduate programs, the School of Medicine has been training the majority of PhD and Masters students in the biomedical sciences across grounds. However, this year is the first that these PhD and Masters degrees were conferred by the School of Medicine! Twenty students received their PhD, eight received their MS-Clinical Research, and 23 received their MPH.

(l-r) Dr. Gary Owens and MD/PhD student Richard Baylis

Research
I was thrilled that our own Richard Baylis, an MD-PhD student, was selected to attend the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany, in late June. He joined 600 young, international scientists who were able to talk with 43 Nobel Laureates and present current research for advice and feedback. He works in Gary Owens’ lab in the Cardiovascular Research Center investigating the influence of inflammation on key cell types thought to regulate the stability of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions.

The Hartwell Foundation again designated the University of Virginia as one of the Top Ten Centers of Biomedical Research. This allows us to nominate researchers for a Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award for early-stage, cutting-edge biomedical research with the potential to benefit children. Sanchita Bhatnagar, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, was selected by the foundation as a Hartwell Investigator for 2018-2021.

This year’s U.S. News & World Reportrankings brought us good news, too. On the “2019 Best Medical Schools” list, the School of Medicine moved up one spot to #26 in Research. The rankings reflect the growing strength of our research funding as well as the continued impact of our innovative curriculum. In Primary Care, we went from #24 to #21, making us the top-ranked academic medical center in Virginia for Primary Care based on factors such as assessments by peers and residency directors and the percentage of graduates entering primary care fields.

Our research portfolio grew from $202 million in FY17 to $223 million in FY18! This increase represents hard work by all our faculty, including new recruits and strategic hires who both transferred and brought in new grants. I note that we have a record number of research proposals that include federal agencies and sources other than the NIH, and that concerted efforts are being made to submit collaborative and center proposals in addition to our historically strong individual proposals. I anticipate these will pay off in the near future.

The home of the new Global Genomics and Bioinformatics Institute, our partnership with Inova in northern Virginia, is in its final design phase. We expect to be able to occupy it in the early months of 2020. The mission of the research partnership is to improve the health and quality of life through the application of genomics and associated molecular science. To do this, we will be focusing on the thematic areas of genetics and genomics; structural and systems biology; developmental biology; computational biology, computational engineering and bioinformatics; and biomedically directed engineering.

Clinical
There are so many accolades that I can’t list all of the recognition our hospital, physicians, and specialty programs received this past year! U.S. News & World Reportdesignated UVA as the #1 Hospital in Virginia for the third year in a row, and identified five specialties in the Top 50, four High-Performing Specialties, and eight High-Performing Common Adult Procedures and Conditions. BlackDoctor.org also named the Medical Center one the 60 “Top Hospitals for Diversity.”

We were recognized with Comprehensive Stroke Center status, received Comprehensive Care Designation for the Pulmonary Hypertension Center, and 193 faculty members — almost 25% of our physicians — are on the Best Doctors in America list! Becker’s Hospital Review recognized UVA on many of its “100 Great Programs” list, including Oncology, Heart, Orthopedics, Neurosurgery and Spine, and Great Hospitals in America.

Seeing all of this recognition summarized — and remember, this is not a comprehensive list — really underscores that the work you are doing is being celebrated nationally for its excellence and quality. It’s exhilarating to be part of an organization that is doing such outstanding work and knowing that our teams are consistently recognized in the national arena. I’m proud of every individual who contributes!

Going forward
The members of my cabinet see their primary role as serving you. To that end, we work to create a work environment that enables excellence, improves organizational structures and processes, enhances the educational experience, and builds external relationships and strengthens development. We strive to ensure a working and learning setting where all are included, welcomed, and provided the opportunity to be their best.

The dean’s office will continue to put effort into the following priorities:

  • Operationalize the UVA Inova Genomics Institute and the regional medical school campus for UVA 3rd- and 4th-year medical students at Inova.
  • Continue an aggressive investment in research and faculty recruitment.
  • Increase our NIH portfolio to $150 million by 2020.

Thank you for pausing and reflecting with me on what we accomplished together during this past year. I also want to recognize that many of these accomplishments were made possible by the strong partnership and support from the Medical Center. I am honored to work for you — a group of capable, imaginative, inspiring, and passionate individuals who make up our faculty, staff, and students. Given your talents and drive, I know that the future of the University of Virginia School of Medicine is incredibly bright.

Sincerely,
David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Li Appointed New Chair of Family Medicine

Dear Colleagues: I am pleased to announce that Li Li, MD, PhD, MPH, has been appointed as Chair of the Department of Family Medicine, effective January 1, 2019.

After receiving his MD at Tongji Medical University (1986) in Wuhan, Hubei, P.R. China, Dr. Li became a Lecturer at the Institute of Social Medicine at Tongji where he also earned his MPH (1989). He then attended the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angles where he earned his MS in Applied Biometry (1995) and his PhD in Preventive Medicine (1996). He then pursued his post-doctoral fellowship in Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute (1997), and completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Kentucky in Lexington (2000).

In 2000, Dr. Li accepted a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Medicine, attaining the rank of tenured full Professor of Family Medicine in 2013. He was also appointed Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences. He is the founding director of the Case School of Medicine PhD program in Clinical Translational Science, the director of the Mary Ann Swetland Center for Environmental Health, and the director of the Case-China Health Initiative.

Dr. Li also serves as the Associate Director for Prevention Research at Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this role he oversees population and prevention research for all aspects of translational cancer research, and has made significant contributions to many large NCI-funded multi-investigator research programs.

His research interests focus on cancer, molecular/genetic epidemiology, and disease prevention. He has a particular interest in the complex relationships among the environment, genome, behavior, lifestyle, and colon cancer etiology and prevention. He has established a number of large cancer and population health research programs including the Kentucky Colon Cancer Genetic Epidemiology Study, the Cleveland Colon Screening and Risk Factors Study, and the ‘Zhabei Health 2020’ study in China, a research collaboration with the Shanghai Zhabei Health Bureau to study lifestyle, environments, and genetic determinants of health in a community-based cohort of 48,000 people.

As Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and Director of Population Health at the UVA Health System, Dr. Li’s charge is to develop and strengthen community engagement, further develop the department’s existing international health program, and build capacity in translational population research.

Please join me in welcoming Dr. Li.

Also, please join me in thanking Dr. Susan Pollart who served as interim chair while the search was in progress. Even while she continued to carry out her full-time duties as Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development, Dr. Pollart has been a strategic and capable leader of the department. I am very grateful for her leadership and for her willingness to remain in this role until Dr. Li arrives on January 1, 2019.

Sincerely,

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

A Special Message from Dean Wilkes

The July 4 holiday begins the most popular time for summer vacations for many of us. I wish for each of you a well-deserved rest. Prior to vacation season, I’d like to share some good news about our School.

Even though we’ve not reached the June 30 end of the current fiscal year, it’s clear that you have knocked it out of park in all areas of our School’s mission.

In education

  • The incoming class of 156 medical students has a mean GPA of 3.86 and a mean MCAT of 518.27 (the 97th percentile!). This year the class is 57% out-of-state and continues to have good diversity. The BIMS PhD programs have recruited a strong new class of graduate students.
  • 99% of our class matched in outstanding post-graduate programs.
  • Richard Baylis, MD/PhD student in the lab of Gary Owens, attended the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in June, where he and other young investigators from around the world had the opportunity to mingle with and get feedback from 43 Nobel Laureates.
  • All of the accrediting bodies that were required to approve the establishment of the School of Medicine-Inova Campus did so without stipulation. Our admissions team is getting ready to start recruiting the class of 2023, which will be the first class to have the option to do their clerkships at the Inova Campus.

In the clinical realm

  • Over 25% of our physicians are included on the 2017-18 Best Doctors in America list. This is phenomenal!
  • Becker’s Hospital Review recognized our hospital as one of the 100 Great Hospitals in America in 2018.
  • Our hospital continues to be #1 in Virginia.

And in research

  • SOM funding is poised to exceed last year’s totals, thanks to the continued outstanding efforts of all of our faculty and new strategic hires.
  • We scored a 21 on our CTSA application! Although we’ll know more in August, a number of people outside of UVA have confirmed that this is an extraordinary score.
  • The Hartwell Foundation again named UVA as one of its Top Ten Centers of Biomedical Research.
  • The UVA IRBs received accreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc. (AAHRPP).
  • The U.S. News & World Report rankings were further evidence of the extraordinary work you do. Primary Care rose to 21 (from 24) and Research went to 26 (from 27).

Finally, the School is in a strong financial position with operating revenues exceeding expenditures. Year-to-date through May 2018, the School of Medicine had an operating net income of $8 million. The Dean’s Reserve funded $31 million in strategic investments in all mission areas in clinical and basic science departments, as well as in centers. In addition, with strong financial management at all levels, we are entering our fourth consecutive year of no tuition increase for medical students.

You, our faculty, are the reason we have had such a remarkable year and are in a strong position both academically and fiscally. I am deeply grateful to you for your commitment to our shared vision and for your hard work that has resulted in this banner year for our School.

With warm regards,

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Coming This Fall: Patient Student Partnership

The Patient Student Partnership will pair our students with a chronically ill adult or pediatric patient to follow for all four years of medical school.

With the success of the Phronesis Project (which we wrote about here), the School of Medicine has expanded this longitudinal patient experience and made it part of the curriculum for this year’s incoming class. This program, known as Patient Student Partnership (PSP), will pair each of the 160 students in SMD22 with a chronically ill adult or pediatric patient to follow for all four years of medical school.

Students will attend clinic visits, be present as the patient’s advocate, and help the patient navigate the Health System. This partnership will give students the opportunity to learn about healthcare through the eyes of a patient and to witness the trajectory of chronic illness.

This first patient relationship will give students context to their medical education and will provide them with a real-world touchpoint, something in which to ground their newly acquired knowledge.

A few things to note:

  • Clinicians: Please be aware that, starting in October 2018, first-year students will accompany patients to clinic visits in the role of patient advocate.
  • Pre-clerkship faculty who teach students: Students now will have real patients and thus real exposure to health problems to complement classroom learning.

This is a notable moment in the continuous improvement of our curriculum. Students will receive unique patient exposure during their first semester of medical school. This relationship promises to be an enriching and rewarding (and educational!) experience. It is my hope that the early formation of a special doctor-patient relationship will remind our students exactly why they chose to study medicine at the University of Virginia in the first place.

As students enter their fourth year of study, they will begin the process of handing off their patients to the newly arriving first years — and the cycle will begin anew for many of our patients.

Everything we do at the School is in service to our patients, and the feedback from previous years’ participants has been very enthusiastic. Patients loved the same thing I love, namely, watching our students grow and evolve into young physicians.  And the students have recognized that our patients are our best teachers — something most doctors always have known.

Thank you to all of the faculty who worked on the Phronesis Project. That pilot set the groundwork for this amazing next step. Also, thank you to all the primary care clinics and specialty practices across Grounds who aided in recruiting patients and provided this opportunity for our students. And most importantly, I thank our patients. Without their generosity this initiative would be impossible.

For more information on PSP, visit the website. If you have questions, contact Colleen Kiernan.

R.J. Canterbury, MD, MS, DLFAPA
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor
Senior Associate Dean for Education

Highlights: March MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean
David S. Wilkes, MD

  • Dean Wilkes highlighted three individuals who received distinguished recognition:
    • B. Cameron Webb, MD, JD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, was recognized by the Congressional Black Caucus and the National Minority Quality Forum as one of the “40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health.”
    • Pamela Sutton-Wallace, Medical Center CEO, was among the “Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare 2018” identified by Modern Healthcare.
    • Richard Baylis, MD/PhD student in Gary Owens’ lab, is among 600 students worldwide selected to attend the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. He will have the opportunity to meet and talk science with 43 Nobel Laureates.
  • IT Security Upgrade
    • The recent upgrade was made with the primary purpose of addressing urgent needs to ensure patient data is safe. This has brought about some unintended outcomes, such as variable access to programs and files resulting in work-arounds. The dean reminded people that Health System shared drives (e.g., “Y”) can be used for sharing or storing information, including PHI. Non-confidential information can be shared via UVA Box or Collab. Call the Help Desk at 434.924.5334 if you are having trouble accessing programs or files. We will have another update at the April MAC.

Funding Analysis/NIH Rankings
Margaret A. Shupnik, PhD

  • Dr. Shupnik showed a chart of funding over a 10-year period and noted that total funding is up and we are diversifying our portfolio. There has been a big increase in successful non-modular grants.
  • The NIH ranking contains all awards – new, renewed, non-competitive continuations, and supplements of all types of awards. It includes all subcontracts if the PI is at UVA and does not include NIH subcontracts received from other institutions.
  • There is considerable volatility of dollars awarded among the rankings of 35-45 and one grant has the potential to bring about an increase or a decrease in the rankings.
  • Dr. Shupnik’s analysis shows that we have many fewer P and U grants than other institutions and this appears to be the primary factor in our ranking not being higher. These awards enable scientists to do the kind of work that one person cannot do alone, and they bring more than funds – they also bring impact and status within the scientific community and provide infrastructure and administrative support.
  • Resources are available – ResearchNet, the Conafay Group – at the institutional level, in addition to department resources such as pre-submission grant review. ResearchNet can provide some shared SOM/VPR support for complicated team/center proposal submissions.
  • NIH rankings information is at http://www.brimr.org/NIH_Awards/NIH_Awards.htm.

On the Path to Academic Success
Susan M. Pollart, MD

  • Annual reviews, which are required for every faculty member, are especially important for faculty at the end of their first three years. For tenure eligible faculty members, it is important to realistically assess potential for the first promotion. For tenure ineligible faculty, the appointment after the third year of employment must be for three years. Regardless of tenure eligibility, faculty members not meeting expectations at the end of the third year of employment can be given a one year notice of non-renewal.
  • Promotion and Tenure
    • New guidelines provide updated/clarified guidelines regarding criteria for excellence in team science.
    • Dean Wilkes is sending the SOM P&T Committee’s specific recommendations to individual faculty members (promoted on July 1, 2017) who are eligible for further advancement (i.e. tenured associate professors, tenure eligible associate professors, and tenure ineligible associate professors). These recommendations identify areas to recommended focus to help ensure success in their next advancement.

Health System Financial Overview
Douglas Lischke, Chief Accounting Officer

  • Mr. Lischke provided an update of the consolidated Health System financials.

Health System Board Update
A. Bobby Chhabra, MD

Dr. Chhabra shared highlights from the February 28, 2017, HSB meeting. The HS goals dashboard for FY18 showed strong performance with eight out of twelve indicators green.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, April 10, 2018, in the BIMS Classroom.

UVA Provides MOCA, Not Latte

(l-r) Keith Littlewood, MD; Chuck Stanton; Saimon Malakor; Angel Thompson; Maria Vazquez-Amaral, JD; Vaia Abatzis, MD; and Ira Rubenstein.

Did you know that the University of Virginia School of Medicine is one of the 20 charter sites for physicians to receive their Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology (MOCA)? Doctors travel to sites across the country for recertification, and here at UVA, they spend a day in the Claude Moore Medical Education Building’s Medical Simulation Center, learning and demonstrating their proficiencies for patient care.

In the 10-year MOCA re-credentialing cycle, anesthesiologists must earn 50 points in their knowledge and skills assessments. By coming to our Simulation Center every five years, doctors can earn 25 points on each single-day visit. It is, by far, the most efficient way of getting those points. We take this seriously and, points aside, strive to provide an enriching learning environment for attendees.

We push them, and we push them hard. The entire day is almost entirely simulation-based. Participants break up into teams and experience simulated patients in crisis situations: cardiovascular instability, hypoxemia, malignant hyperthermia, anesthesia toxicity. The works. Then we add a twist: How do these situations resolve with, say, pregnant patients?

Not every test is an emergency. We also present participants with situations that are common or from which they would benefit from practice, like sepsis. From rare to common to close-calls to abnormal … our Simulation Center provides a variety of learning experiences.

SOM’s MOCA Is More than Recertification
Because no patient is cared for by a single person, the healthcare team’s performance is also evaluated. After each exercise, the team gathers to debrief. I believe this is a crucial part of the experience. The team candidly talks about what happened during in the simulation. They answer the question, “What were you thinking?” in an educational, non-judgmental way. There is a tacit assumption that our participants are smart and provide good care to patients — but, what trap did the team fall into? What were they doing (or not doing) together? We not only care about what occurred to result in the simulated patient receiving a bad outcome, but also what can be done to ensure this does not happen again. It is an opportunity to raise the bar for all attendees.

MOCA is administered through the American Society of Anesthesiology, and they invite participants to take a “customer satisfaction” survey. Feedback on our Sim Center experience has been wonderfully positive. Many physicians are happy to come to our School and receive their recertification in this manner. For us, it’s not just a matter of making sure anesthesiologists have their points and that they can check an item off their to-do list. We take pride that, when participants leave UVA, they feel it was a worthwhile experience. Many leave Grounds feeling that the day spent in our Simulation Center changed the way they think about their practice. That is incredibly rewarding.

Our Simulation Center is excellent and there are many talented people who have contributed mightily to its success, from the moment it was conceived to today. This includes Dr. Marcus Martin, Dr. Mark Kirk, Dr. Vaia Abatzis, Dr. Keith Littlewood, the Claude Moore Foundation, and the faculty and staff who envisioned the NxGen curricula and support the center itself. They have my gratitude and my thanks.

R.J. Canterbury, MD, MS, DLFAPA
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor
Senior Associate Dean for Education