Wilkes: School of Medicine Year in Review

Dean David Wilkes

Dear Colleagues: Cruising through the mountains on my bicycle is a great way to clear my head, slow my thinking, and contemplate how much there is to appreciate — such as the beauty of the forest and the valleys, the serenity of being in nature, and the joy that comes from doing what I am passionate about.

Something else that I’m passionate about is serving you in my role of dean. I am so proud of what our faculty and staff do each day to ensure that our patients and our learners have the best experience possible. As I begin my fourth year as dean, I am grateful for what we have accomplished together. Below are some of the highlights that come to my mind. Please remember these are some of the highlights, and is not all inclusive of the many great things that have occurred. So, I will welcome you to comment and let me know what you and your colleagues have done that’s missing from the list!

Match Day 2018

Education
We had a wildly successful Match Day, with 99% of our students matching. Students are going to Yale, Emory, Penn, Vanderbilt, Wake Forest, Johns Hopkins, Mass General, and other high-quality institutions. The most popular programs were internal medicine, emergency medicine, ob/gyn, pediatrics, and anesthesiology.

Thanks to the support of our alumni and donors, we are able to provide scholarships that allow our students to graduate with an average debt level that is lower than the national average. And thanks to sound fiscal stewardship, the School is entering its fourthyear of a tuition freeze. Our goal is no tuition increase through 2021.

The McIntire School of Commerce is collaborating with us on a leadership track in the medical school curriculum and has partnered with us to develop a leadership program for graduate students and faculty. These programs will differentiate us from other medical schools while helping our students and faculty learn the skills and qualities needed to flourish as leaders in the field of healthcare.

The education partnership with Inova reached another milestone when all three of the state and national oversight agencies granted formal approval to establish the UVA School of Medicine Inova Campus in Fairfax. The entering class of 2019 will be the first to have the option to complete their third and fourth years at the Inova Campus.

Our medical school class continues to be among the most diverse in the nation. For the sixth year in a row, the SOM received the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from INSIGHT Into Diversitymagazine. And again, our entering class ranks in the 96th percentile academically of all medical students in the United States.

Since the inception of the graduate programs, the School of Medicine has been training the majority of PhD and Masters students in the biomedical sciences across grounds. However, this year is the first that these PhD and Masters degrees were conferred by the School of Medicine! Twenty students received their PhD, eight received their MS-Clinical Research, and 23 received their MPH.

(l-r) Dr. Gary Owens and MD/PhD student Richard Baylis

Research
I was thrilled that our own Richard Baylis, an MD-PhD student, was selected to attend the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany, in late June. He joined 600 young, international scientists who were able to talk with 43 Nobel Laureates and present current research for advice and feedback. He works in Gary Owens’ lab in the Cardiovascular Research Center investigating the influence of inflammation on key cell types thought to regulate the stability of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions.

The Hartwell Foundation again designated the University of Virginia as one of the Top Ten Centers of Biomedical Research. This allows us to nominate researchers for a Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award for early-stage, cutting-edge biomedical research with the potential to benefit children. Sanchita Bhatnagar, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, was selected by the foundation as a Hartwell Investigator for 2018-2021.

This year’s U.S. News & World Reportrankings brought us good news, too. On the “2019 Best Medical Schools” list, the School of Medicine moved up one spot to #26 in Research. The rankings reflect the growing strength of our research funding as well as the continued impact of our innovative curriculum. In Primary Care, we went from #24 to #21, making us the top-ranked academic medical center in Virginia for Primary Care based on factors such as assessments by peers and residency directors and the percentage of graduates entering primary care fields.

Our research portfolio grew from $202 million in FY17 to $223 million in FY18! This increase represents hard work by all our faculty, including new recruits and strategic hires who both transferred and brought in new grants. I note that we have a record number of research proposals that include federal agencies and sources other than the NIH, and that concerted efforts are being made to submit collaborative and center proposals in addition to our historically strong individual proposals. I anticipate these will pay off in the near future.

The home of the new Global Genomics and Bioinformatics Institute, our partnership with Inova in northern Virginia, is in its final design phase. We expect to be able to occupy it in the early months of 2020. The mission of the research partnership is to improve the health and quality of life through the application of genomics and associated molecular science. To do this, we will be focusing on the thematic areas of genetics and genomics; structural and systems biology; developmental biology; computational biology, computational engineering and bioinformatics; and biomedically directed engineering.

Clinical
There are so many accolades that I can’t list all of the recognition our hospital, physicians, and specialty programs received this past year! U.S. News & World Reportdesignated UVA as the #1 Hospital in Virginia for the third year in a row, and identified five specialties in the Top 50, four High-Performing Specialties, and eight High-Performing Common Adult Procedures and Conditions. BlackDoctor.org also named the Medical Center one the 60 “Top Hospitals for Diversity.”

We were recognized with Comprehensive Stroke Center status, received Comprehensive Care Designation for the Pulmonary Hypertension Center, and 193 faculty members — almost 25% of our physicians — are on the Best Doctors in America list! Becker’s Hospital Review recognized UVA on many of its “100 Great Programs” list, including Oncology, Heart, Orthopedics, Neurosurgery and Spine, and Great Hospitals in America.

Seeing all of this recognition summarized — and remember, this is not a comprehensive list — really underscores that the work you are doing is being celebrated nationally for its excellence and quality. It’s exhilarating to be part of an organization that is doing such outstanding work and knowing that our teams are consistently recognized in the national arena. I’m proud of every individual who contributes!

Going forward
The members of my cabinet see their primary role as serving you. To that end, we work to create a work environment that enables excellence, improves organizational structures and processes, enhances the educational experience, and builds external relationships and strengthens development. We strive to ensure a working and learning setting where all are included, welcomed, and provided the opportunity to be their best.

The dean’s office will continue to put effort into the following priorities:

  • Operationalize the UVA Inova Genomics Institute and the regional medical school campus for UVA 3rd- and 4th-year medical students at Inova.
  • Continue an aggressive investment in research and faculty recruitment.
  • Increase our NIH portfolio to $150 million by 2020.

Thank you for pausing and reflecting with me on what we accomplished together during this past year. I also want to recognize that many of these accomplishments were made possible by the strong partnership and support from the Medical Center. I am honored to work for you — a group of capable, imaginative, inspiring, and passionate individuals who make up our faculty, staff, and students. Given your talents and drive, I know that the future of the University of Virginia School of Medicine is incredibly bright.

Sincerely,
David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Li Appointed New Chair of Family Medicine

Dear Colleagues: I am pleased to announce that Li Li, MD, PhD, MPH, has been appointed as Chair of the Department of Family Medicine, effective January 1, 2019.

After receiving his MD at Tongji Medical University (1986) in Wuhan, Hubei, P.R. China, Dr. Li became a Lecturer at the Institute of Social Medicine at Tongji where he also earned his MPH (1989). He then attended the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angles where he earned his MS in Applied Biometry (1995) and his PhD in Preventive Medicine (1996). He then pursued his post-doctoral fellowship in Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute (1997), and completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Kentucky in Lexington (2000).

In 2000, Dr. Li accepted a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Medicine, attaining the rank of tenured full Professor of Family Medicine in 2013. He was also appointed Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences. He is the founding director of the Case School of Medicine PhD program in Clinical Translational Science, the director of the Mary Ann Swetland Center for Environmental Health, and the director of the Case-China Health Initiative.

Dr. Li also serves as the Associate Director for Prevention Research at Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this role he oversees population and prevention research for all aspects of translational cancer research, and has made significant contributions to many large NCI-funded multi-investigator research programs.

His research interests focus on cancer, molecular/genetic epidemiology, and disease prevention. He has a particular interest in the complex relationships among the environment, genome, behavior, lifestyle, and colon cancer etiology and prevention. He has established a number of large cancer and population health research programs including the Kentucky Colon Cancer Genetic Epidemiology Study, the Cleveland Colon Screening and Risk Factors Study, and the ‘Zhabei Health 2020’ study in China, a research collaboration with the Shanghai Zhabei Health Bureau to study lifestyle, environments, and genetic determinants of health in a community-based cohort of 48,000 people.

As Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and Director of Population Health at the UVA Health System, Dr. Li’s charge is to develop and strengthen community engagement, further develop the department’s existing international health program, and build capacity in translational population research.

Please join me in welcoming Dr. Li.

Also, please join me in thanking Dr. Susan Pollart who served as interim chair while the search was in progress. Even while she continued to carry out her full-time duties as Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development, Dr. Pollart has been a strategic and capable leader of the department. I am very grateful for her leadership and for her willingness to remain in this role until Dr. Li arrives on January 1, 2019.

Sincerely,

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

A Special Message from Dean Wilkes

The July 4 holiday begins the most popular time for summer vacations for many of us. I wish for each of you a well-deserved rest. Prior to vacation season, I’d like to share some good news about our School.

Even though we’ve not reached the June 30 end of the current fiscal year, it’s clear that you have knocked it out of park in all areas of our School’s mission.

In education

  • The incoming class of 156 medical students has a mean GPA of 3.86 and a mean MCAT of 518.27 (the 97th percentile!). This year the class is 57% out-of-state and continues to have good diversity. The BIMS PhD programs have recruited a strong new class of graduate students.
  • 99% of our class matched in outstanding post-graduate programs.
  • Richard Baylis, MD/PhD student in the lab of Gary Owens, attended the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in June, where he and other young investigators from around the world had the opportunity to mingle with and get feedback from 43 Nobel Laureates.
  • All of the accrediting bodies that were required to approve the establishment of the School of Medicine-Inova Campus did so without stipulation. Our admissions team is getting ready to start recruiting the class of 2023, which will be the first class to have the option to do their clerkships at the Inova Campus.

In the clinical realm

  • Over 25% of our physicians are included on the 2017-18 Best Doctors in America list. This is phenomenal!
  • Becker’s Hospital Review recognized our hospital as one of the 100 Great Hospitals in America in 2018.
  • Our hospital continues to be #1 in Virginia.

And in research

  • SOM funding is poised to exceed last year’s totals, thanks to the continued outstanding efforts of all of our faculty and new strategic hires.
  • We scored a 21 on our CTSA application! Although we’ll know more in August, a number of people outside of UVA have confirmed that this is an extraordinary score.
  • The Hartwell Foundation again named UVA as one of its Top Ten Centers of Biomedical Research.
  • The UVA IRBs received accreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc. (AAHRPP).
  • The U.S. News & World Report rankings were further evidence of the extraordinary work you do. Primary Care rose to 21 (from 24) and Research went to 26 (from 27).

Finally, the School is in a strong financial position with operating revenues exceeding expenditures. Year-to-date through May 2018, the School of Medicine had an operating net income of $8 million. The Dean’s Reserve funded $31 million in strategic investments in all mission areas in clinical and basic science departments, as well as in centers. In addition, with strong financial management at all levels, we are entering our fourth consecutive year of no tuition increase for medical students.

You, our faculty, are the reason we have had such a remarkable year and are in a strong position both academically and fiscally. I am deeply grateful to you for your commitment to our shared vision and for your hard work that has resulted in this banner year for our School.

With warm regards,

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Coming This Fall: Patient Student Partnership

The Patient Student Partnership will pair our students with a chronically ill adult or pediatric patient to follow for all four years of medical school.

With the success of the Phronesis Project (which we wrote about here), the School of Medicine has expanded this longitudinal patient experience and made it part of the curriculum for this year’s incoming class. This program, known as Patient Student Partnership (PSP), will pair each of the 160 students in SMD22 with a chronically ill adult or pediatric patient to follow for all four years of medical school.

Students will attend clinic visits, be present as the patient’s advocate, and help the patient navigate the Health System. This partnership will give students the opportunity to learn about healthcare through the eyes of a patient and to witness the trajectory of chronic illness.

This first patient relationship will give students context to their medical education and will provide them with a real-world touchpoint, something in which to ground their newly acquired knowledge.

A few things to note:

  • Clinicians: Please be aware that, starting in October 2018, first-year students will accompany patients to clinic visits in the role of patient advocate.
  • Pre-clerkship faculty who teach students: Students now will have real patients and thus real exposure to health problems to complement classroom learning.

This is a notable moment in the continuous improvement of our curriculum. Students will receive unique patient exposure during their first semester of medical school. This relationship promises to be an enriching and rewarding (and educational!) experience. It is my hope that the early formation of a special doctor-patient relationship will remind our students exactly why they chose to study medicine at the University of Virginia in the first place.

As students enter their fourth year of study, they will begin the process of handing off their patients to the newly arriving first years — and the cycle will begin anew for many of our patients.

Everything we do at the School is in service to our patients, and the feedback from previous years’ participants has been very enthusiastic. Patients loved the same thing I love, namely, watching our students grow and evolve into young physicians.  And the students have recognized that our patients are our best teachers — something most doctors always have known.

Thank you to all of the faculty who worked on the Phronesis Project. That pilot set the groundwork for this amazing next step. Also, thank you to all the primary care clinics and specialty practices across Grounds who aided in recruiting patients and provided this opportunity for our students. And most importantly, I thank our patients. Without their generosity this initiative would be impossible.

For more information on PSP, visit the website. If you have questions, contact Colleen Kiernan.

R.J. Canterbury, MD, MS, DLFAPA
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor
Senior Associate Dean for Education

Highlights: March MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean
David S. Wilkes, MD

  • Dean Wilkes highlighted three individuals who received distinguished recognition:
    • B. Cameron Webb, MD, JD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, was recognized by the Congressional Black Caucus and the National Minority Quality Forum as one of the “40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health.”
    • Pamela Sutton-Wallace, Medical Center CEO, was among the “Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare 2018” identified by Modern Healthcare.
    • Richard Baylis, MD/PhD student in Gary Owens’ lab, is among 600 students worldwide selected to attend the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. He will have the opportunity to meet and talk science with 43 Nobel Laureates.
  • IT Security Upgrade
    • The recent upgrade was made with the primary purpose of addressing urgent needs to ensure patient data is safe. This has brought about some unintended outcomes, such as variable access to programs and files resulting in work-arounds. The dean reminded people that Health System shared drives (e.g., “Y”) can be used for sharing or storing information, including PHI. Non-confidential information can be shared via UVA Box or Collab. Call the Help Desk at 434.924.5334 if you are having trouble accessing programs or files. We will have another update at the April MAC.

Funding Analysis/NIH Rankings
Margaret A. Shupnik, PhD

  • Dr. Shupnik showed a chart of funding over a 10-year period and noted that total funding is up and we are diversifying our portfolio. There has been a big increase in successful non-modular grants.
  • The NIH ranking contains all awards – new, renewed, non-competitive continuations, and supplements of all types of awards. It includes all subcontracts if the PI is at UVA and does not include NIH subcontracts received from other institutions.
  • There is considerable volatility of dollars awarded among the rankings of 35-45 and one grant has the potential to bring about an increase or a decrease in the rankings.
  • Dr. Shupnik’s analysis shows that we have many fewer P and U grants than other institutions and this appears to be the primary factor in our ranking not being higher. These awards enable scientists to do the kind of work that one person cannot do alone, and they bring more than funds – they also bring impact and status within the scientific community and provide infrastructure and administrative support.
  • Resources are available – ResearchNet, the Conafay Group – at the institutional level, in addition to department resources such as pre-submission grant review. ResearchNet can provide some shared SOM/VPR support for complicated team/center proposal submissions.
  • NIH rankings information is at http://www.brimr.org/NIH_Awards/NIH_Awards.htm.

On the Path to Academic Success
Susan M. Pollart, MD

  • Annual reviews, which are required for every faculty member, are especially important for faculty at the end of their first three years. For tenure eligible faculty members, it is important to realistically assess potential for the first promotion. For tenure ineligible faculty, the appointment after the third year of employment must be for three years. Regardless of tenure eligibility, faculty members not meeting expectations at the end of the third year of employment can be given a one year notice of non-renewal.
  • Promotion and Tenure
    • New guidelines provide updated/clarified guidelines regarding criteria for excellence in team science.
    • Dean Wilkes is sending the SOM P&T Committee’s specific recommendations to individual faculty members (promoted on July 1, 2017) who are eligible for further advancement (i.e. tenured associate professors, tenure eligible associate professors, and tenure ineligible associate professors). These recommendations identify areas to recommended focus to help ensure success in their next advancement.

Health System Financial Overview
Douglas Lischke, Chief Accounting Officer

  • Mr. Lischke provided an update of the consolidated Health System financials.

Health System Board Update
A. Bobby Chhabra, MD

Dr. Chhabra shared highlights from the February 28, 2017, HSB meeting. The HS goals dashboard for FY18 showed strong performance with eight out of twelve indicators green.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, April 10, 2018, in the BIMS Classroom.

UVA Provides MOCA, Not Latte

(l-r) Keith Littlewood, MD; Chuck Stanton; Saimon Malakor; Angel Thompson; Maria Vazquez-Amaral, JD; Vaia Abatzis, MD; and Ira Rubenstein.

Did you know that the University of Virginia School of Medicine is one of the 20 charter sites for physicians to receive their Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology (MOCA)? Doctors travel to sites across the country for recertification, and here at UVA, they spend a day in the Claude Moore Medical Education Building’s Medical Simulation Center, learning and demonstrating their proficiencies for patient care.

In the 10-year MOCA re-credentialing cycle, anesthesiologists must earn 50 points in their knowledge and skills assessments. By coming to our Simulation Center every five years, doctors can earn 25 points on each single-day visit. It is, by far, the most efficient way of getting those points. We take this seriously and, points aside, strive to provide an enriching learning environment for attendees.

We push them, and we push them hard. The entire day is almost entirely simulation-based. Participants break up into teams and experience simulated patients in crisis situations: cardiovascular instability, hypoxemia, malignant hyperthermia, anesthesia toxicity. The works. Then we add a twist: How do these situations resolve with, say, pregnant patients?

Not every test is an emergency. We also present participants with situations that are common or from which they would benefit from practice, like sepsis. From rare to common to close-calls to abnormal … our Simulation Center provides a variety of learning experiences.

SOM’s MOCA Is More than Recertification
Because no patient is cared for by a single person, the healthcare team’s performance is also evaluated. After each exercise, the team gathers to debrief. I believe this is a crucial part of the experience. The team candidly talks about what happened during in the simulation. They answer the question, “What were you thinking?” in an educational, non-judgmental way. There is a tacit assumption that our participants are smart and provide good care to patients — but, what trap did the team fall into? What were they doing (or not doing) together? We not only care about what occurred to result in the simulated patient receiving a bad outcome, but also what can be done to ensure this does not happen again. It is an opportunity to raise the bar for all attendees.

MOCA is administered through the American Society of Anesthesiology, and they invite participants to take a “customer satisfaction” survey. Feedback on our Sim Center experience has been wonderfully positive. Many physicians are happy to come to our School and receive their recertification in this manner. For us, it’s not just a matter of making sure anesthesiologists have their points and that they can check an item off their to-do list. We take pride that, when participants leave UVA, they feel it was a worthwhile experience. Many leave Grounds feeling that the day spent in our Simulation Center changed the way they think about their practice. That is incredibly rewarding.

Our Simulation Center is excellent and there are many talented people who have contributed mightily to its success, from the moment it was conceived to today. This includes Dr. Marcus Martin, Dr. Mark Kirk, Dr. Vaia Abatzis, Dr. Keith Littlewood, the Claude Moore Foundation, and the faculty and staff who envisioned the NxGen curricula and support the center itself. They have my gratitude and my thanks.

R.J. Canterbury, MD, MS, DLFAPA
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor
Senior Associate Dean for Education

iCan. Can You?

A few months ago, we discussed the development of VMED, an integrated learning-, curriculum-, and student-management system. The development team is still working on the first iteration of the product, which we hope to have available in the summer to test.

Related to VMED is the Interactive Clinical Assessment Navigator (iCan), a tool through which we can assess entrustable professional activities (EPA). EPAs cover basic skills a physician should have, such as taking a patient history, documenting an encounter, performing basic procedures, collaborating as part of an interprofessional team, and interpreting lab values. In terms of use, we have seen dramatic expansion of iCan’s use in the past few months. It was first implemented in part of the clerkship class, then moved to all of SMD19, and is now also being used by SMD20. By the fall, SMD21 and SMD22 will be using it as well. It’s exciting to see a product we developed being implemented so widely and quickly.

But this is about more than a new tool and who is using it. This is about using the lean methodology and continuous process improvement to make our systems better. Better for faculty and better for students. It’s about asking, “Is this the best way to assess our students’ clinical performance?” If it’s not, we stop the process and collaborate to find a solution. The key word here is “continuous.” There’s no finish line in our improvement journey.

iCan is a part of the larger VMED system and, thus far, has been well received. The team is continuing to meet with system leaders, clerkship directors and coordinators, faculty, and staff to discuss what to expect from iCan and to understand how it will help facilitate preparation for the next academic year.

I offer my thanks to Maryellen Gusic, MD, who has been a champion for EPAs and iCan, and is one of the reasons its expansion across the cohorts of students is going so well. For more information on VMED — a timeline, progress dashboard, and other documentation — visit the website here. If you have questions, please contact Kim Holman. Keep an eye on the Dean’s Office Blog in June for the next VMED update.

R.J. Canterbury, MD
Senior Associate Dean for Education
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor

Making Virginia Medicine Better: (l-r) Dr. Megan Bray, Dr. Mary Kate Worden, Kim Holman, Dr. Maryellen Gusic, Robert Pastor, Dr. Randolph Canterbury, and Mark Moody.

Highlights: January MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean
David S. Wilkes, MD

  • Budget Construction
    • As the budget season gets underway, we will all have to consider the significant implications of the recent tax bill. We expect immediate restrictions that will be ongoing. Just two examples (changes in 340B reimbursements and the loss of automatic inpatient status for Medicare total knee replacements) result in an annual decrease of $14 million. We anticipate an additional annual decrease of $10 million due to the impact of the repeal of the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act.
    • These reductions will hit the Medical Center’s bottom line and, clearly, will influence what it is able to pass through to the School of Medicine.
    • Although we must plan for financial restrictions, we must not compromise on excellence.
    • We must prioritize and focus on what is strategic and necessary, and we must determine what we will not do.
  • DAR Feedback
    • Several chairs noted that the DAR does not provide a mechanism for faculty to offer feedback on the chair’s performance.
    • The 2015 Faculty Forward Survey had robust data (due to high faculty participation) to share with the chairs. The survey will be administered again in the fall of 2018, and, as in 2015, it will be helpful if the chairs encourage their faculty to participate.
    • In the fall of 2019, we will conduct a 360 feedback survey that focuses exclusively on the chair.
    • Thank you to those who provided feedback on the DAR process.

February Medical Alumni Gathering
Anne Watkins

  • The Medical Alumni Association’s winter retreat will be held February 16-17 at the Lansdowne Resort and Spa in Leesburg.
  • Now that the graduate degrees have moved to the School of Medicine, the MAA is actively interacting with our graduate students. The retreat will feature a Friday evening poster session that will feature the work of about 40 graduate and medical students.
  • All faculty and students are invited to attend.
  • org/event/2018-Winter-Retreat/

New Business

  • Dr. Nataro asked about unexplained variances between RVUs and collections. Susan Rumsey will bring administrators together to discuss this further.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, in the BIMS Classroom.

Highlights: December MAC Meeting

Opening Comments from the Dean
David S. Wilkes, MD

  • Implications of HR 1, Tax Cut and Jobs Act, on Graduate Student Stipends
    • Negative impact upon our students, UVA, and nation
      • College will be less affordable
      • Discourages participation in higher education
      • Discourages employer investment in employee learning
      • Decreases US competitiveness
      • Brightest minds will go outside of the US to advance
    • Elimination of Section 117(d) provisions
      • Devastating to research programs
      • No longer able to provide tax-free tuition for graduate students
        • Example: stipend of $24K and tuition waiver of $29K – student’s tax bill triples to $4,920
      • Erodes progress made in developing strong interest in STEM programs
        • Puts STEM education out of the reach of many students
      • Our legislators
      • Themes of Incoming UVA President Ryan
        • Community: opportunity to interact with and learn from a broadly diverse group of students, faculty, staff
        • Discovery: new knowledge that solves problems, leads to practical application, and brings new perspective to enduring questions
        • Service: public universities serve the public, starting with their own states
      • New Strategic Hire: Ken Walsh, PhD. Professor of CV Medicine and Director, Whitaker CV Institute, at Boston University SOM. Starts January 25, 2018. $.9M year one, $3.5M over five years.

Overview of Equal Opportunity & Civil Rights Policies and Reporting Options
Catherine Spear, AVP Equal Opportunity & Civil Rights
Emily Babb, AVP for Title IX Compliance & Title IX Coordinator

  • Presentation addressed:
    • Notice of non-discrimination and equal opportunity
    • Policy of Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (Title IX Policy)
    • Preventing and Addressing Discrimination and Harassment (PADH Policy) and Preventing and Addressing Retaliation (PAR Policy)
    • Why reporting is important
    • How to report prohibited conduct under these policies
    • How to address prohibited conduct
  • See presentation.

December Health System Board Update
A. Bobby Chhabra, MD, Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery

  • Dr. Chhabra shared highlights from the December 6, 2017, HSB meeting. The HS goals dashboard showed notable improvement in solid organ and bone marrow transplants and addition investments by Seed & Venture Funds, moving these two indicators to green. All other categories are yellow.
  • FY18 first-quarter financial results were shared.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in the BIMS Classroom.

It’s Time for You to THRIV

THRIV’s inaugural class of scholars: (l-r) Dustin Walters, MD; Jessica Keim-Malpass, PhD, RN; Kathleen McManus, MD, MS; Brynne Sullivan, MD; and Kyle J. Lampe, PhD.

The Translational Health Research Institute of Virginia (THRIV) program has announced a new call for proposals for mentored career development awards for junior faculty at UVA who are pursuing a career in clinical or translational research.

THRIV is a transformational cross-Grounds collaboration that leverages the latest advances in data science to accelerate innovation in health-related research and facilitate team science. THRIV seeks to support highly qualified junior faculty for activities related to the development of a successful clinical research or translational research career.

The first group of scholars came from three different schools across Grounds — the School of Nursing, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and the School of Medicine — and I am excited see that applications are now open for the next group of promising scientists.

The THRIV Scholar Career Development Program aims to train the next generation of translational researchers in principles of data science, the conduct of rigorous and reproducible science, and to promote team science as a means to enhance innovation and discovery in health-related research. The program provides up to 75% salary/fringe support for up to 2 years for Scholars in addition to funding for research-related expenses and training.

For details visit THRIV’s website, or contact Sandra Burks.

Margaret A. Shupnik, PhD
Gerald D. Aurbach Professor of Endocrinology
Professor of Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Research