Highlights: October MAC Meeting

The School of Medicine’s Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) met on Oct. 9, 2018, 4-5 p.m., in the Medical Education Building’s Learning Studio. Here are highlights from that meeting:

Opening Comments
David S. Wilkes, MD
Dr. Wilkes announced that Dr. Li Li is the incoming chair of the Department of Family Medicine. Dr. Li, who comes to us from Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, has research interests in cancer, molecular/genetic epidemiology, and disease prevention. He will start January 1, 2019. Dr. Wilkes thanked Dr. Susan Pollart for serving as interim chair while she continued to carry out her responsibilities as Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development. 

Dr. Jonathan Kipnis’ article, “The Seventh Sense,” regarding his discovery that the immune system is crucial to the brain’s functioning, was featured on the August 2018 cover of Scientific American. Dr. Kipnis received an ovation from his colleagues for being recognized with an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award. 

StandPoint Survey
Susan M. Pollart, MD
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development
At the end of the first week that the StandPoint Survey was open, the response rate was 20%, surpassing the AAMC week one average response of 16%. Dr. Pollart thanked the chairs for encouraging their faculty to participate. The survey will be open through November 9. 

Dr. Pollart stated that department chairs will have three institutional goals and one departmental aspirational goal as an outcome of the department annual reviews. One of the institutional goals is the chair’s encouragement of faculty participation in the survey and development of a robust action plan based on the survey results. 

Health System Board Update
A. Bobby Chhabra, MD Chair, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Dr. Chhabra shared highlights from the September 2018 HSB meeting. The meeting was shortened considerably due to weather concerns, so the only topics to review were the year-end HS financials and results from the physician engagement survey. The results provide a baseline that will inform future surveys. 

Highlighting New Faculty
Anindya Dutta, PhD
Chair, Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics
Dr. Dutta provided an introduction to Hao Jiang, PhD, and Golam Mohi, PhD, both of whom are recent recruits in the area of cancer research. 

Dr. Jiang’s research interest is on the MLL complex in hematologic malignancies and differentiation. His research has shown that AKAP95 forming liquid condensates with appropriate dynamics is important for gene regulation and tumorigenesis. This offers an unconventional opportunity for cancer treatment by perturbing the material state of protein droplets. He comes from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. He brings to UVA an R01 and Scholar Awards from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, American Cancer Society, and American Society of Hematology. 

Dr. Mohi’s research interests are in hematopoietic stem cell biology, cell signaling, and cancer, with a major focus on myeloproliferative neoplasms and breast cancer. He works on the JAK-STAT signal transducing pathway and on several tyrosing protein phosphatases important for these disorders. He comes from SUNY Upstate Medical University and brings an R01, two R21s, a Scholar Award from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and a Worldwide Cancer Research Award. 

Both recruits stated that the opportunity to collaborate with our outstanding faculty, particularly John Bushweller, PhD, and the multiple BMG faculty members interested in epigenetics and cancer was a factor in their decision to come to UVA. 

Highlighting New Faculty
James P. Nataro, MD, PhD, MBA
Chair, Pediatrics
In the last two years, Dr. Nataro recruited two physician-scientists into the Division of Hematology & Oncology to work with the core of excellent clinicians focused on patient care. Brian Belyea, MD, a member of the Child Health Research Center, is investigating cell type that lead to leukemia and works closely with Ariel Gomez, MD, and Maria Luisa Sequeira-Lopez, MD. The division was further enhanced with the recruitment of Daniel “Trey” Lee, MD, from the National Cancer Institute. He works with CAR T-cell therapy to battle treatment-resistant leukemia in children and also has been the first to use CAR T-cell therapy for pediatric brain cancer. 

Dr. Nataro has just recruited Michael Engel, MD, PhD, who will start November 1 as the division chief for Hematology & Oncology. His research focuses on the use of small molecules to repair the GFI1-LSD axis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and he will have collaborations with Biochemistry. 

In 2016, Dr. Nataro recruited Sean Moore, MD, as a strategic hire into the Division of Gastroenterology & Nutrition. Dr. Moore’s major research interest is the influence of the intestinal microbiota in environmental enteropathy. His investigation into the use of intestinal organoids to understand diurnal variation in gut function is funded by the NIH, and he has Gates Foundation support to study gender differences in the response to under-nutrition. 

Sana Syed, MD, MS, was recruited from Harvard to join Dr. Moore’s research team. Dr. Syed very quickly acquired funding from the Gates Foundation, an NIH K award, and an iTHRIV award. Dr. Syed uses Big Data to understand the histopathologic features of environmental enteropathy among children in developing countries. She is a member of the Center for Global Health and holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. 

Patricio Ray, MD, is a strategic hire who joins the Division of Nephrology on November 1. Coming from Children’s National Health System, he brings five R01s to fund his work in HIV nephropathy. His group has developed new biomarkers and permeability assays to follow the outcome of HIV nephropathy, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute kidney injury in critically ill children or newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. His interest in the unique susceptibility of African individuals to HIV nephropathy fits well with the focus of the Global Genomics and Bioinformatics Research Institute in Fairfax, where he will have a lab. 

Dr. Ray joins three other R01-funded pediatric nephrologists (R. Ariel Gomez, MD; Maria Luisa Sequeira-Lopez, MD; and Jennifer Charlton, MD) in the Child Health Research Center, making the center the largest pediatric nephrology research center in the world. 

The next meeting will be Tuesday, November 13, 2018, in the MEB Learning Studio.

Wilkes: School of Medicine Year in Review

Dean David Wilkes

Dear Colleagues: Cruising through the mountains on my bicycle is a great way to clear my head, slow my thinking, and contemplate how much there is to appreciate — such as the beauty of the forest and the valleys, the serenity of being in nature, and the joy that comes from doing what I am passionate about.

Something else that I’m passionate about is serving you in my role of dean. I am so proud of what our faculty and staff do each day to ensure that our patients and our learners have the best experience possible. As I begin my fourth year as dean, I am grateful for what we have accomplished together. Below are some of the highlights that come to my mind. Please remember these are some of the highlights, and is not all inclusive of the many great things that have occurred. So, I will welcome you to comment and let me know what you and your colleagues have done that’s missing from the list!

Match Day 2018

Education
We had a wildly successful Match Day, with 99% of our students matching. Students are going to Yale, Emory, Penn, Vanderbilt, Wake Forest, Johns Hopkins, Mass General, and other high-quality institutions. The most popular programs were internal medicine, emergency medicine, ob/gyn, pediatrics, and anesthesiology.

Thanks to the support of our alumni and donors, we are able to provide scholarships that allow our students to graduate with an average debt level that is lower than the national average. And thanks to sound fiscal stewardship, the School is entering its fourthyear of a tuition freeze. Our goal is no tuition increase through 2021.

The McIntire School of Commerce is collaborating with us on a leadership track in the medical school curriculum and has partnered with us to develop a leadership program for graduate students and faculty. These programs will differentiate us from other medical schools while helping our students and faculty learn the skills and qualities needed to flourish as leaders in the field of healthcare.

The education partnership with Inova reached another milestone when all three of the state and national oversight agencies granted formal approval to establish the UVA School of Medicine Inova Campus in Fairfax. The entering class of 2019 will be the first to have the option to complete their third and fourth years at the Inova Campus.

Our medical school class continues to be among the most diverse in the nation. For the sixth year in a row, the SOM received the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from INSIGHT Into Diversitymagazine. And again, our entering class ranks in the 96th percentile academically of all medical students in the United States.

Since the inception of the graduate programs, the School of Medicine has been training the majority of PhD and Masters students in the biomedical sciences across grounds. However, this year is the first that these PhD and Masters degrees were conferred by the School of Medicine! Twenty students received their PhD, eight received their MS-Clinical Research, and 23 received their MPH.

(l-r) Dr. Gary Owens and MD/PhD student Richard Baylis

Research
I was thrilled that our own Richard Baylis, an MD-PhD student, was selected to attend the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany, in late June. He joined 600 young, international scientists who were able to talk with 43 Nobel Laureates and present current research for advice and feedback. He works in Gary Owens’ lab in the Cardiovascular Research Center investigating the influence of inflammation on key cell types thought to regulate the stability of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions.

The Hartwell Foundation again designated the University of Virginia as one of the Top Ten Centers of Biomedical Research. This allows us to nominate researchers for a Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award for early-stage, cutting-edge biomedical research with the potential to benefit children. Sanchita Bhatnagar, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, was selected by the foundation as a Hartwell Investigator for 2018-2021.

This year’s U.S. News & World Reportrankings brought us good news, too. On the “2019 Best Medical Schools” list, the School of Medicine moved up one spot to #26 in Research. The rankings reflect the growing strength of our research funding as well as the continued impact of our innovative curriculum. In Primary Care, we went from #24 to #21, making us the top-ranked academic medical center in Virginia for Primary Care based on factors such as assessments by peers and residency directors and the percentage of graduates entering primary care fields.

Our research portfolio grew from $202 million in FY17 to $223 million in FY18! This increase represents hard work by all our faculty, including new recruits and strategic hires who both transferred and brought in new grants. I note that we have a record number of research proposals that include federal agencies and sources other than the NIH, and that concerted efforts are being made to submit collaborative and center proposals in addition to our historically strong individual proposals. I anticipate these will pay off in the near future.

The home of the new Global Genomics and Bioinformatics Institute, our partnership with Inova in northern Virginia, is in its final design phase. We expect to be able to occupy it in the early months of 2020. The mission of the research partnership is to improve the health and quality of life through the application of genomics and associated molecular science. To do this, we will be focusing on the thematic areas of genetics and genomics; structural and systems biology; developmental biology; computational biology, computational engineering and bioinformatics; and biomedically directed engineering.

Clinical
There are so many accolades that I can’t list all of the recognition our hospital, physicians, and specialty programs received this past year! U.S. News & World Reportdesignated UVA as the #1 Hospital in Virginia for the third year in a row, and identified five specialties in the Top 50, four High-Performing Specialties, and eight High-Performing Common Adult Procedures and Conditions. BlackDoctor.org also named the Medical Center one the 60 “Top Hospitals for Diversity.”

We were recognized with Comprehensive Stroke Center status, received Comprehensive Care Designation for the Pulmonary Hypertension Center, and 193 faculty members — almost 25% of our physicians — are on the Best Doctors in America list! Becker’s Hospital Review recognized UVA on many of its “100 Great Programs” list, including Oncology, Heart, Orthopedics, Neurosurgery and Spine, and Great Hospitals in America.

Seeing all of this recognition summarized — and remember, this is not a comprehensive list — really underscores that the work you are doing is being celebrated nationally for its excellence and quality. It’s exhilarating to be part of an organization that is doing such outstanding work and knowing that our teams are consistently recognized in the national arena. I’m proud of every individual who contributes!

Going forward
The members of my cabinet see their primary role as serving you. To that end, we work to create a work environment that enables excellence, improves organizational structures and processes, enhances the educational experience, and builds external relationships and strengthens development. We strive to ensure a working and learning setting where all are included, welcomed, and provided the opportunity to be their best.

The dean’s office will continue to put effort into the following priorities:

  • Operationalize the UVA Inova Genomics Institute and the regional medical school campus for UVA 3rd- and 4th-year medical students at Inova.
  • Continue an aggressive investment in research and faculty recruitment.
  • Increase our NIH portfolio to $150 million by 2020.

Thank you for pausing and reflecting with me on what we accomplished together during this past year. I also want to recognize that many of these accomplishments were made possible by the strong partnership and support from the Medical Center. I am honored to work for you — a group of capable, imaginative, inspiring, and passionate individuals who make up our faculty, staff, and students. Given your talents and drive, I know that the future of the University of Virginia School of Medicine is incredibly bright.

Sincerely,
David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Li Appointed New Chair of Family Medicine

Dear Colleagues: I am pleased to announce that Li Li, MD, PhD, MPH, has been appointed as Chair of the Department of Family Medicine, effective January 1, 2019.

After receiving his MD at Tongji Medical University (1986) in Wuhan, Hubei, P.R. China, Dr. Li became a Lecturer at the Institute of Social Medicine at Tongji where he also earned his MPH (1989). He then attended the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angles where he earned his MS in Applied Biometry (1995) and his PhD in Preventive Medicine (1996). He then pursued his post-doctoral fellowship in Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute (1997), and completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Kentucky in Lexington (2000).

In 2000, Dr. Li accepted a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Medicine, attaining the rank of tenured full Professor of Family Medicine in 2013. He was also appointed Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences. He is the founding director of the Case School of Medicine PhD program in Clinical Translational Science, the director of the Mary Ann Swetland Center for Environmental Health, and the director of the Case-China Health Initiative.

Dr. Li also serves as the Associate Director for Prevention Research at Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this role he oversees population and prevention research for all aspects of translational cancer research, and has made significant contributions to many large NCI-funded multi-investigator research programs.

His research interests focus on cancer, molecular/genetic epidemiology, and disease prevention. He has a particular interest in the complex relationships among the environment, genome, behavior, lifestyle, and colon cancer etiology and prevention. He has established a number of large cancer and population health research programs including the Kentucky Colon Cancer Genetic Epidemiology Study, the Cleveland Colon Screening and Risk Factors Study, and the ‘Zhabei Health 2020’ study in China, a research collaboration with the Shanghai Zhabei Health Bureau to study lifestyle, environments, and genetic determinants of health in a community-based cohort of 48,000 people.

As Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and Director of Population Health at the UVA Health System, Dr. Li’s charge is to develop and strengthen community engagement, further develop the department’s existing international health program, and build capacity in translational population research.

Please join me in welcoming Dr. Li.

Also, please join me in thanking Dr. Susan Pollart who served as interim chair while the search was in progress. Even while she continued to carry out her full-time duties as Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development, Dr. Pollart has been a strategic and capable leader of the department. I am very grateful for her leadership and for her willingness to remain in this role until Dr. Li arrives on January 1, 2019.

Sincerely,

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Highlights: September MAC Meeting

The School of Medicine’s Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) met on Sept. 11, 2018, 4-5 p.m., in the Medical Education Building’s Learning Studio. Here are highlights from that meeting:

Opening Comments
David S. Wilkes, MD
Dr. Wilkes recognized Dr. Frederick G. Hayden for his study showing that a single dose of a new influenza drug can shorten the duration of this illness. This has the strong potential for changing how influenza is treated. 

Dean Wilkes noted that the department/center annual reviews have begun. The goal-setting process will be different this year — there will be both institutional goals determined by the dean’s office and department goals that the chairs/directors have identified. At the end of the process, these goals will be documented and distributed to each chair/director. 

StandPoint Survey
Susan M. Pollart, MD
“Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development
“The StandPoint Survey (formerly called the Faculty Forward Engagement Survey) will be open from October 2 through November 9. The survey includes custom questions that look at professionalism and unprofessional behavior and how to respond to it. Other questions will link to the recent Press Ganey survey taken by clinical faculty. Press Ganey focused on clinical services whereas StandPoint looks across all missions 

Department results and review of the dashboards will take place January 16-29, 2019. The chairs will meet with AAMC StandPoint leaders on January 30 from 7-9 AM. One of the institutional goals (as mentioned by Dean Wilkes in his opening comments) will be participation in the survey and responding to department-specific results. 

Health System Logo
Trish Cluff
Chief Strategic Relations and Marketing Officer
Ms. Cluff explained that the University has changed all brand standards (e.g., logo, colors, fonts) and, as a result, we must update all branded materials (signage, letterhead, etc.) in the Health System. The group provided feedback on two versions of the logo, and the Dean acknowledged consensus on one. 

The new Health System brand standards will be implemented in January 2019. 

Email and Records Management
Caroline J. Walters, CRM
University Records Officer
Ms. Walters gave an overview of the policy that requires us to comply with the Virginia Public Records Act for retention and disposition of public records. Both electronic and physical records must be stored in compliance with policy standards (and Ms. Walters noted that Fontana Foods and Charlottesville U-Store It are not compliant storage facilities). Before destroying records, a Certificate of Records Destruction (RM3 Form) must be completed to document approval and document destruction. 

The Act requires that records be retained for a specific period of time according to the type of record. Prior to destroying the records, confirm that the Records Officer has given approval and that there are no pending audit, legal, FOIA, or other issues. Records should be destroyed within 12 months of the expired retention period or within 6 months if the records contain personally identifiable information. 

Email retention is managed by its content and is destroyed when the reference value ends and the other conditions (e.g., time period) for destruction are met. Historical correspondence of deans, VPs, CEO is transferred to the designated archival repository and all other is destroyed after five years. The correspondence of department/unit heads is destroyed after three years and, for all other employees, after two years. Correspondence related to general office operations can be destroyed when the administrative value ends 

The Records Management office can answer questions, providing training and consultation, evaluate storage solutions, and provide other related services. More information is at www.virginia.edu/recordsmanagement, or you can direct questions to records@virginia.edu. 

The next meeting will be Tuesday, October 9, 2018, in the MEB Learning Studio.

Welcome to UVA, Class of 2022!

On Friday, Aug. 10, the School of Medicine welcomed the 156 students of the Class of 2022 to the University of Virginia at the 2018 White Coat Ceremony and Convocation, endowed by the Class of 1965, held in Old Cabell Hall. This is an annual event presented by the UVA Medical Alumni Association (MAA) and Medical School Foundation (MSF).

Barry Collins, Executive Director of the UVA MAA and MSF and Associate Dean for Medical Alumni Affairs, welcomed the new students, families, and attendees. Student speaker Brielle Gerry, SMD19, President, School of Medicine Mulholland Society, taught the new students about the “anatomy of the white coat.” School of Medicine Dean David Wilkes, MD, James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science, stressed that students should not forget the patient when they are learning and — when caring for patients — students should remember to “see and be seen,” “listen,” and “touch.”

As Randolph Canterbury, MD, Senior Associate Dean for Education, read out the 156 student names, college deans Meg Keeley, MD, (Dunglison); John Densmore, MD, PhD, (Hunter); Christine Peterson, MD, (Pinn); Sean Reed, MD, (Reed), and Director of the Medical Scientist Training Program Dean Kedes, MD, PhD, assisted the students into their crisp, white coats.

Welcome to the University of Virginia, Class of 2022!

Our Students Organize a Week of Reflection and Positivity

In response to the events of August 2017 and, in anticipation of continued conflict this year, UVA’s chapter of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA) organized a “Week of Reflection and Positivity.” One of the events was a T-shirt sale and photo opportunity to spread kindness and hope.

Whiteboards were on hand that read, “Charlottesville is a place for _____, not hate.” Faculty, staff, and students were encouraged to fill in the blank space with what the Charlottesville and UVA community means to them.

Some days I read the news and am disheartened. Then I come to work. I see our students. I see our faculty and staff. I see hope and healing, teaching and tolerance. I see unity and respect. I am very grateful to my colleagues and our students who remind me daily that our School is home to outstanding individuals with huge hearts.

Thank you to all who participated. I look forward to seeing these wonderful shirts around town. It is my hope that this message of positivity ripples out from our School throughout the community and beyond.

Below are a few images taken throughout the week. Enjoy!

R.J. Canterbury, MD, MS, DLFAPA
Wilford W. Spradlin Professor
Senior Associate Dean for Education

Highlights: August MAC Meeting

The School of Medicine’s Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) met on August 14, 2018, 4-5 p.m., in the Biomedical Sciences classroom. Here are highlights from that meeting:

Opening Comments
Randolph J. Canterbury, MD
Dr. Canterbury began by thanking the physicians, staff, and emergency management teams across the Health System, the University, and the community for their planning and preparations to keep us safe during the weekend.

He then shared highlights from the US News & World Reportrankings. Most notably, the UVA Medical Center was named Virginia’s #1 hospital for the third year in a row! Congratulations to all for their contributions toward the excellent care resulting in this recognition!

StandPoint Survey
Susan M. Pollart, MD
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development
The StandPoint Survey (formerly called the Faculty Forward Engagement Survey) will be administered this fall over a five-week period in October and November. The first survey highlighted areas of opportunity for the dean’s office in governance, explaining finances, communications, and faculty retention. Each department learned of their own areas of opportunity. Action plans were created, and examples can be found on the web here.

Department results and review of the dashboards will take place January 16-29, 2019. The chairs will meet with AAMC StandPoint leaders on January 30 from 7-9 AM.

IT Security Enhancements
Jason C. Belford, Chief Information Security Officer
Erin M. Trost, Information Security Manager
Mr. Belford noted that we are facing increasing cybersecurity threats, and gave the specific example of two Nigerians working out of Malaysia who used a sophisticated phishing scam to steal 1,400 W-2s two years ago. Passwords alone are insufficient and so, like many other organizations, we are moving to two-factor identification for Outlook web and VPN access. It is easy to learn and to use.

Ms. Trost explained that our options for dual authentication were determined to align with federal government requirements for e-prescribing.

The University enabled 2-step authentication for NetBadge login in 2017. It will be required for Outlook web access (OWA) by September 17, for Virtual Private Network (VPN) access by September 30, and for Workday by January 2019.

New ACGME Requirements
Susan Kirk, MD
Designated Institutional Officer and Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education
The ACGME has issued a statement that it values the strength that arises from a diverse group of residents, fellows, faculty, leaders, and others. Expectations around recruitment and retention mirror those of the LCME. Beginning next year, we will be show that we are tracking diversity GME trainees and faculty by including the percent of underrepresented minorities (URMs) we have recruited. The GME Office has already begun to do that for you, and the clinical chairs all received letters with their percentage of URM faculty and trainees in the spring. Although we will specifically track the percentage of residents and fellows who self-identify as African-American, Latino/Hispanic, Pacific Islander, and Native American, we also strongly support the recruitment of any resident or fellow who helps diversify our programs, including those with diverse gender, sexual identity, country of origin, race, or ethnicity.

After August 2017, we experienced an immediate decline in the number of URM residents and fellows interested in coming to UVA. Of those who did come here, nearly all attended a diversity recruitment program. There will be a number of these again this year.

Dr. Kirk said we will hold our first-ever First Look program on Saturday, September 15th and asked that each chair encourage all of their faculty to attend. Applicants have said they recognize that the URM faculty value diversity and inclusion, and they would like to know that the majority faculty also share these values. One way to demonstrate the commitment to diversity and inclusion is by participating in the First Look and other diversity programs.

The next meeting will be Tuesday, September 11, 2018, in the MED Learning Studio.

Your Voice Leads to Action: StandPoint Survey Coming Soon!

This fall will mark three years since the School of Medicine (SOM) faculty participated in the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) survey known as StandPoint (formerly Faculty Forward). Based on those results and your feedback, we took many steps to make changes. We posted a blog entry about those changes in January of this year, which you can read here.

This year, the StandPoint survey will be open to faculty from October 2 – November 9. As we approach October 2, you will receive multiple reminder emails. In 2015, we had an amazing 75% response rate, and I hope that even faculty more will participate this year.

The survey, which is completely confidential, will similar to the prior one. There will be new questions addressing faculty burnout, resilience, and wellness.

The Road Ahead
In mid-January, when the survey results are available, we will share them with department chairs. AAMC StandPoint leaders will be on site at the end of January to meet with chairs, faculty senators, the dean’s cabinet, department administrators, and the SOM’s StandPoint Task Force.

The results will be shared within your department in February and March, with action-planning to commence soon after. As with the last survey, Dr. Buer and I are available to visit departments to discuss the survey results and to meet with faculty in smaller, focused discussions. In April, departments will report their action plans and we expect implementation to begin in May.

Your voices lead to action and we can effect positive change when we understand issues that are important to you.

If you have questions, please visit the StandPoint Suvey page on the Faculty Affairs and Development website. If you have questions, please contact Dr. Troy Buer.

Susan M. Pollart, MD, MS
Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor and Chair (interim) of Family Medicine
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development

2017-18 Promotion & Tenure

Last week, I had the pleasure of celebrating the newly promoted/tenured faculty in the School of Medicine. Please join me in congratulating and recognizing them — their hard work and excellence has been recognized by the Promotion and Tenure Committees and the Board of Visitors.

Congratulations to the following individuals!

Promotion to Associate Professor

  • Adli Mazhar, PhD, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
  • Heather Asthagiri, MD, Associate Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Matthew Barrett, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology
  • Lindsay Bazydlo, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology
  • Mark Beenhakker, PhD, Associate Professor of Pharmacology
  • Brendan Bowman, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Elizabeth Bradley, PhD, Associate Professor of Medical Education
  • Juliana Bueno, MD, Associate Professor of Radiology and Medical Imaging
  • Julia den Hartog, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Bimal Desai, PhD, Associate Professor of Pharmacology
  • Colleen Druzgal, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics
  • Joshua Eby, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Alban Gaultier, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience
  • Alejandro Gru, MD, Associate Professor of Pathology
  • Winston Gwathmey, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Michael Hainstock, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics
  • Michael Hanley, MD, Associate Professor of Radiology and Medical Imaging
  • Rachel Hays, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • David Kashatus, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
  • Jamie Kennedy, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Jennifer Kirby, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Maria Kirzhner, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
  • Daniel Landes, MD, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology
  • Leigh Lather, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • James Martindale, PhD, Associate Professor of Medical Education
  • Shetal Padia, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Kwon-SikPark, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
  • Patcharin Pramoonjago, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology
  • Girija Ramakrishnan, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Tinsley Rucker, MD, Associate Professor of Family Medicine
  • Rebecca Scharf, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics
  • Binit Shah, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology
  • Amit Shahane, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences
  • Aditya Sharma, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Rahul Sharma, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Yevgeniy (Eugene) Shildkrot, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
  • Shayna Showalter, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery
  • Brooke Vergales, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics
  • Gay Wehrli, MD, Associate Professor of Pathology

Promotion to Associate Professor and the Award of Tenure

  • Andrew Southerland, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology

The Award of Tenure

  • Curtis Argo, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Brian Behm, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • James Browne, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Forrest Calland, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery
  • Nathan Charlton, MD, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine
  • Alison Criss, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
  • Nicole Deal, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Rebecca Dillingham, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Andrew Dudley, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
  • Myla Goldman, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology
  • Peter Kasson, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics
  • Wilson Miller, PhD, Associate Professor of Radiology and Medical Imaging
  • Christopher Moore, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Neeral Shah, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Adam Shimer, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • James Stone, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Radiology and Medical Imaging
  • Matthew Trowbridge, MD, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

Promotion to Professor

  • Kristen Atkins, MD, Professor of Pathology
  • Todd Bauer, MD, Professor of Surgery
  • Randal Blank, MD, PhD, Professor of Anesthesiology
  • Mark DeBoer, MD, Professor of Pediatrics
  • Brant Isakson, PhD, Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics
  • Alexander Krupnick, MD, Professor of Surgery
  • Scott Lim, MD, Professor of Medicine
  • Keith Littlewood, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology
  • Lawrence Merkel Jr., MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences
  • Margaret Plews-Ogan, MD, Professor of Medicine
  • Jacob Raphael, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology
  • Costi Sifri, MD, Professor of Medicine
  • Eunice Singletary, MD, Professor of Emergency Medicine
  • Mohamed Tiouririne, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology
  • Nassima Tiouririne, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science

Have You Signed Up for UVA Alerts?

Dean David Wilkes

The best time to prepare for an emergency is before one occurs. In that spirit, I ask you to sign up or update your UVA Alerts account now and make certain that you are a member of the UVA Health System group. If you don’t have an account, please create one. This should not take you more than five minutes.

UVA Alerts is how we notify you in case of an emergency. With the one-year mark of last August approaching, we want to able to reach you should unplanned events take place that may affect your safety. We’ll also want to notify you throughout the year should other events occur.

To sign up, click here. After completing your preferred contact information, click on “Groups” in the upper-right corner and subscribe to “UVA Health System Emergency Notifications.” Once you create an account, you will be able to login and add an additional mobile phone numbers and up to six email addresses. This is a great way to keep non-University affiliated friends and family informed about critical events.

If you have questions about UVA Alerts, there is a robust FAQ page, which you can read here. (This includes confidentiality of your phone number, frequency of alerts, changing service provider or mobile number, a sample message, and more.)

Another great source for official emergency information is on UVA’s Office of Safety and Emergency Preparedness page, found at www.virginia.edu/emergency. In the event of an emergent situation, you can find high-level details and schedule-change information on this site.

Your safety is important! Thank you for doing this.

David S. Wilkes, MD
Dean, UVA School of Medicine
James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science